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Robert Scott and Winifred Green

-- INTRODUCTION  –

Wesley G. Scott (1831 - 1907) with the help of his daughters -- Hannah (Mrs. Levi H.) Scott, Libbie (Mrs. Alexander) Dean, Eunice (Mrs. Julian T.) Miller -- were key individuals who passed along and handed down significant information regarding the Scott families and Scott generations that settled around Scottsville,   Floyd County, Indiana.  Wesley Scott, village blacksmith and postmaster of Scottsville, was a second generation “Hoosier” who among his relatives was the first to organize ancestral recollections.  Some believe that his daughters helped him in this effort, and during an illness late in life, one of his daughters wrote important memories before Wesley’s death.  After his death in 1907, arrangements were made by his daughters to type, edit, and eventually distribute the memoirs to all who may be interested.  The memoirs have been included in Floyd County records at the City-County Building.  On December 9, 1933, they were placed in Book 12, Miscellaneous Records, #2280, pages 4 & 5.

Through the generations, the memoirs were passed down from relative to relative, and found their way into Southern Indiana libraries.  Lennie R. Berkey, deceased, from Salem, Indiana, once discovered “old” papers at the home of nephew, Billy Martin, Martinsburg, Indiana.  The old papers turned out to be “Wesley’s memoirs!”  Lennie re-copied them and sent them to the Salem, Indiana Library.  They were re-copied again by Helen Burgess in 1969.  Mrs. R. H. Konig, Carmel, California, sent me her copy and it contained two extra sentences.  By now, one can find some variations on Wesley’s memoirs including annotations and notes attached.  The New Albany-Floyd County Public Library, Indiana Room has long made its copies available to the public.  The DAR, Piankeshaw Chapter, Genealogical Records Committee, included Wesley’s memoirs in their book, “Bible Records and Family Records, pages 163-174.”   So, whether Wesley's memoirs are in libraries or in personal records of interested Scotts and their many allied families, the memoirs can be found with one common name, Wesley G. Scott, and entitled, “The Scott Family:  A Pioneer Family of Kentucky and Indiana.”  

Cuthbert L. "Bert" Scott II and his son, C.L. "Bert" Scott III had in their possession the earliest manuscript of Wesley G. Scott's memoirs.  It came directly from Wesley Scott's daughter, Hannah (Mrs. Levi H.) Scott.  Hannah and Levi Scott gave the document to their daughter, Berla Esther Scott Stamper, who gave it to Cuthbert Scott II.  This document obtained by Cuthbert L. Scott II was dated New Albany, Indiana, 12 January 1906.  In that year Hannah and Levi H. Scott resided in New Albany. 

          I have not seen any other oral history documents earlier than 1906, so I have re-copied in Appendix D this earliest manuscript loaned to me by Cuthbert L. "Bert" Scott II.  In Appendix D, I chose not to append all the other manuscripts named above but simply point out in footnote style where variations occurred among them.  Hannah and Levi H. Scott's manuscript of Wesley G. Scott's memoirs can now be compared with the other manuscripts named above.  The variations between all the manuscripts are in Appendix D with footnotes to point out differences among them.  None of the manuscript differences were due to modern genealogical research.  Since the documents named above were oral history folklore, observable differences have come from within oral history viewpoints.  Obviously some differences were due to re-typing, editing, rearrangements, and typewriter smudges.  But, other differences were based on oral history which came through different branches of the Scott family.  The purpose of Appendix D is to show noticeable differences among the documents named above. 

          Wesley Scott was not perfect in his recollections.  Some family members were embarrassed by his flawed and frailed remembrances or they were embarrassed by his infatuation with famous, historic Scotts or embarrassed with his glorification or ramblings about literary Scotts or religious Scotts.  Also, Wesley Scott did not pretend to be exact about dates and frustrated family researchers who have used his descriptions for historical information.  In reality, Wesley Scott's memoirs were developed one year before his death when he was elderly and frail at the age of 75.  His memories brought him comfort in old age and he added some schmaltz to the tradition of being a Scott. He died 25 June 1907, New Albany, Indiana, home of his daughter, Mrs. Julian T. (Eunice Scott) Miller, 312 Lafayette St., New Albany with funeral service at Chapel Hill Christian Church, Greenville Township, Floyd County, Indiana.  The funeral was conducted by Rev. Frank T. Porter, pastor of Park Christian Church, New Albany.  So, if anyone is aware of other family lore within the Scott lineage, they may compare and evaluate their stories with those compared in Appendix D of this document.

          My research of the Scott families has been motivated by the work of Wesley G. Scott and contemporary persons who were researching their migrating ancestors on the frontier. I have tried to fill in the gaps based on research into the events and mood of the place and time.  I have tried to look into the places where they lived and tempered it with respect.  My work contains narration to accommodate the flow of ancestral history.  My resolve is that family not be lost from memory.

            Footnote entries with[1] [2], etc. following can be clicked to go to the source document. Clicking the [1] again will return you to the previous text spot. Example Rev. J. S. Woods.[1] goes to  [1] The 1877-78 New Albany, Indiana City Directory, and clinking the [1] again returns you to your prior narrative location.

This research has been dedicated to my parents, Seibert and Virginia (Scott) Scott and my wife, Judy, and, daughter, Courtney Ann (Scott) Doran.

Sincerely,
Nelson S. Scott
418 Swisher Avenue
Danville, IL. 61832

Robert Scott and Winifred Green

            Robert Scott was born 1760, Scotland,[1] died between April and August, 1824, Shelby County, Kentucky, burial Shelby County, Kentucky,[2] married around 1778,[3] place not available, Winifred Green, birth date not available, born probably Wales or Scotland, [4] died between 1802 and 1811, Montgomery County, Kentucky, burial Montgomery County, Kentucky.[5]  Winifred Green's parents were not known.  The Greens and Scotts were early settlers around Versailles, Woodford County, Kentucky. 

            Robert Scott’s second marriage was at the age of 52, married [6] 30 September 1812, by Rev. John Mavity, Shelby County, Kentucky, Abagail Eliza Harmon Hedden, born about 1775, Kentucky, died April, 1831,[7] Washington County, Indiana between the towns of Martinsburg and Old Pekin, burial place not known.  Abagail was probably married previously, 22 March 1798, Woodford County, Kentucky, to Elias Hedden.[8]   The Woodford County Marriage Records showed that Hannah Harmon, likely Abagail’s sister, married on the same date, Samuel Hedden; likely another sister, Elizabeth Harmon married on 18 October 1798, Thomas Mitchell.  All three were married by R. Cave.[9]  As noted in Appendix A, a John Mitchell of Shelby County, Kentucky furnished the coffin for Robert Scott’s burial and was a purchaser at Robert Scott’s estate sale.  Some of the Mitchell families lived in Shelby County, Kentucky and also lived near Abagail Scott in Washington County, Indiana where she resided following Robert's death.  She and Robert Scott had no children in their marriage according to family folklore.  The 1820 Washington County, Indiana census was their only census while married and it included Robert Scott’s single son, Dorris G. Scott, born to Robert and his first wife, Winifred.  The 1830 Washington County, Indiana census was Abagail’s only census as a widow.  Her census record indicated other individuals in her household but they were presumed to be other relatives or possibly freed slaves as mentioned in Robert Scott’s Will.

            Federal Census Records: Robert Scott household, 1820 U.S. census, Washington County, Indiana, No Township Listed, stamped page 223 or unstamped page 327, line 50; National Archives micropublication M33, roll 14: Robert Scott, age 45 & up; 1 male, age 16 to 25; 1 female under 10; 1 female, age 10 to 15; 1 female, age 26 to 44, wife Abagail.  Two were in agriculture.  Robert Scott's only unmarried child, Dorris Green Scott, was included as the male son, age 16-25.  The female children were not known.

            Abagail Scott household, 1830 U.S. census, Washington County, Indiana, No Township Listed, page 330, line 5; National Archives micropublication M19, roll 31: Abagail Scott, 1 male of 5 under 10; 1 female of 30 under 40; 1 female of 50 under 60.  At this residence, located between the towns of Martinsburg and Old Pekin, Indiana, Abagail died in April, 1831.[10] 

            Robert Scott died between April - August, 1824 in Shelby County, Kentucky where his will was recorded in the Shelby County Courthouse.[11]  The Will indicated his birth in 1760 and Wesley Scott's memoirs identified the place as Scotland.   

             The quote in Wesley's memoirs was that "Robert Scott, a Baptist Minister, was born in Scotland in 1721, leaving Scotland and going to Wales, from Wales he went to England, then back to Wales."  Robert Scott's Will clearly proved that he was not born in 1721 but 1760.  Also, no church records have been found to verify that he was a practicing Baptist Minister.  But, Clark County, Kentucky history has named a Robert Scott in 1798 who was a founding trustee for the Regular Baptist Church, located near Goshen, Clark County, Kentucky.  This Baptist congregation was in existence, meeting in homes by 1795, before the congregation built its log cabin church. The charter membership included a Robert Scott and an Elizabeth Green.  This researcher, Nelson Scott, visited the church site in 1998.  Montgomery County, Kentucky was less than a mile due east of the church site.  (See Robert Scott's Kentucky residences below which included him in Clark County, Kentucky in the same time period of this Baptist congregation.[12])   Also, the early Indiana history of his sons, John and Moses Scott, clearly indicated that they were Baptist Christians who were among the first people to establish Mt. Eden Church, Greenville Township, Floyd County, Indiana.  Robert Scott's son, Moses Scott, was married in the Beech Creek Baptist Church, Shelby County, Kentucky.  Also, Robert Scott’s 2nd marriage was performed by the Rev. John Mavity, a Christian Church pastor.  Robert Scott had Baptist and Christian Church affiliations in the practice of his faith; but, his ancestors in Scotland or Wales were of the Church of Scotland, Presbyterian Scots.

            In July, 1823, Robert Scott resigned as Justice of the Peace in Jackson Township, Washington County, Indiana.[13]  It was at this time that Robert left Washington County for some unknown reason (possibly due to an illness), returning to Shelby County, Kentucky where he died between April - August, 1824.       

            Robert Scott's origins and more importantly the common origin of his parents, grandparents, including the origins of his wife -- the Green family -- were evident in Wesley's memoirs.  Robert Scott's parents were named as Herbert Scott and Mary Vardemon of Scotland.  Herbert Scott's father was named David Scott.  The ethnic roots of the Scott clan were likely from the "lowlands" of Scotland near the border of England.  In the 1600s and 1700s the lowlands were mostly inhabited by ethnic Scot Presbyterians.  During the 1600s, lowland Scots were able to lease land in northern Ireland under relocation and leasing arrangement established by King Charles of England, who promoted peace between the Church of England and Lowland Presbyterian Scots after years of hatred and religious/economic unrest. Wales like northern Ireland was an appealing relocation area where Robert Scott's antecedents would have dwelled together with Winifred Green's family as Wesley's memoirs have suggested in its folklore.      

            Since Ireland was not mentioned in Wesley's memoirs, it would appear that Robert Scott himself and/or his father, Herbert Scott; and/or his grandfather, David Scott, left the lowlands of Scotland and took their relocation in Wales.  The last country Wesley named for Robert Scott's location was Wales, where as a child Robert Scott or his parents possibly lived before coming to America with either his parents or with the Green family.  His ancestors could have migrated and resided in Wales as much as Scotland.  The Green surname for Winifred and her first name were both ethnic Welsh names!  Her Welsh origins may be the dominant aspect of Wesley's phrases about his grandfather's movements to Wales.  Robert Scott's parents and grandparents could have been a blending of Scottish and Welsh origins, speaking a Celtic language!  Also, in the country of Wales, there may be more bonds, more marriages between the Greens and the Scotts than simply the marriage of Robert and Winifred!  The place of their marriage was not known.

            In Robert Scott’s Shelby County, Kentucky marriage record to Abagail (Harmon) Hedden, his father was named as “Hestra.”[14]   At the Kentucky Historical Society Library, the typed record of their marriage bond showed that Robert Scott's father was Hestra Scott and Eliza Abagail Harmon's father was William Harmon.  In transcribing names from old documents and using memories passed down from families, Herbert and Hestra were close enough in spite of errors to verify that Robert Scott's father was Herbert - Hestra Scott or Hestra - Herbert Scott!  In Wesley’s memoirs, Herbert Scott’s birth was given in 1667, Edinburgh, Scotland and married Mary Vardemon, a woman of Saxon race.  This attempt to fill in the gaps between Hestra and Herbert Scott as names for the father of Robert Scott is to capture the essence of truth so that in the future more research will reveal the precision of fact.       

            Wesley's memoirs named Robert Scott's brother, Elijah Scott.  Among the Welsh-Scotch slang and dialect, Elijah was phonetically pronounced as “EE LY YA.”  The ending letters in Archelaus’ name is “elaus,” phonetically sounded as “EE LY YA” or EE LY YA.” Archelaus Scott’s name was shortened in the slang talk and given a nickname of “EE LY US” or “EE LY YA” which Wesley G. Scott’s memoirs captured as Elijah Scott.  Arch or Ark, the first letters of his name, were not remembered by Wesley G. Scott nor remembered by Arch-EE-LY-YA (Eliyah) Scott’s grandchildren, namely the children born to Harmon and Margaret Reasor Scott.  The nickname, “EE LY YA” was the only recollection.  Scott researchers have believed as Wesley G. Scott reported that Elijah Scott was a precise name, when in actuality it represented the “EE LY YA” nickname of ARK-E-LY-YA SCOTT.

            As indicated in the memoirs, Archelaus Scott’s sons were a John Scott and Moses Scott who were with their father, “EE-LY-YAW” when he came into Kentucky; and a son, Robert Scott who was in Virginia; and a son Harmon Scott, born in Kentucky who settled at Scottsville, Floyd County, Indiana.  Archelaus’ son, Harmon Scott, resided at Scottsville adjacent to his cousins’ John and Moses Scott, who were the sons of Robert Scott.  Wesley Scott’s memoirs are about Robert Scott and his brother, Archelaus (EE-LY-YAW) Scott, who were united in family lore due to their historical records, settlements, and migrations together.  

CHILDREN OF ROBERT AND WINIFRED (GREEN) SCOTT

            Information about the children was based on family lore and genealogical research.  The family lore of Wesley G. Scott’s memoirs corresponded precisely with the children’s names as recorded in Robert Scott’s Will and Estate Settlement documents in Appendix A.  Seven children were born to their marriage per Wesley G. Scott’s memoirs.  Wesley stated that his grandparents were Robert and Winifred (Green) Scott, and wrote, “John Scott, my father, having three brothers, James, Moses, Darris Scott.......the three sisters of my father were Elizabeth, Margaret, and Mary Scott.” Each of these seven children’s historical records, settlements, and migrations with their descendants were researched by Nelson S. Scott in separate documents.  The following is a brief summary of the children.

JAMES SCOTT, born about 1779-1780,[15]  place of birth not known, died late September, 1836, Floyd County, Indiana,[16] burial place not known, married [17] about 1803, Montgomery County, Kentucky, Elizabeth Schultz (Shults), born about 1784, North Carolina,[18] died about 1865, age 82, at the home of her daughter, Elizabeth Sarah Scott Davis, Salt Creek Township, Jackson County, Indiana, burial place not known.  Elizabeth Schultz was the daughter of  Christian Shults, Jr., her paternal grandparents were Christian and Elizabeth Schultz, Sr. who came from Pennsylvania to the Watauga settlement in what is now Carter County, Tennessee (then North Carolina), before 1780 and were early Montgomery County, Kentucky settlers.[19]   

            JOHN SCOTT, born 28 December 1781,[20]  place of birth not known, died[21] 10 January 1862, Lafayette Township, town of Scottsville, Floyd County, Indiana, buried Mt. Eden Church Cemetery, Greenville Township, Floyd County, Indiana,  married [22] 2 January 1815, Shelby County, Kentucky, Anna Reasor, born 25 December 1797, Little Mount, Shelby County, Kentucky which in 1824 became Spencer County, Kentucky, died 3 October 1845, Lafayette Township, town of Scottsville, Floyd County, Indiana, buried Mt. Eden Church Cemetery, Greenville Township, Floyd County, Indiana.  Anna Reasor was the daughter of Michael and Anna Herbert.[23]

            MARGARET SCOTT, born about 1784,[24]  possibly Fayette County, Virginia, died about 1846,[25] Greenville Township, Floyd County, Indiana, burial place probably Mt. Eden Church Cemetery, Greenville Township, Floyd County, Indiana, married [26] 4 January 1804, Clark County, Kentucky, Thomas Ferral (Ferrell), born about 1782, birth place not available, death around Christmas, 1836,[27] Greenville Township, Floyd County, Indiana, burial place likely Mt. Eden Cemetery.  Thomas Ferrell was the son of Peter Ferrell according to Clark County, Kentucky deed records and Peter Ferrell's Will.[28]   Thomas Ferrell's mother was not available.     

            MOSES SCOTT, born 1 March 1789, Woodford County, Virginia,[29] died 3 May 1850, age 61 yrs.  2 mo. and 2 days, Scottsville, Floyd County, Indiana, buried Mt. Eden Church Cemetery, Greenville Township, Floyd County, Indiana, married[30] 23 May 1810, Beech Creek Baptist Church, Shelby County, Kentucky, Elizabeth Shindler, 10 December 1790, Virginia or Pennsylvania, died 19 September 1864, Scottsville, Floyd County, Indiana, buried Mt. Eden Church Cemetery, Greenville Township, Floyd County, Indiana. Elizabeth Shindler’s father was Johann George Shindler.[31]  Elizabeth's mother's name was not available. 

            ELIZABETH ANNE SCOTT, born 24 March 1794, Fayette County, Kentucky, died 21 December 1854, Morgan County, Kentucky, buried in old cemetery near Grassy Creek, Morgan County, Kentucky, married 2 January 1812, Bath County, Kentucky, Joseph Carter, Jr., born 13 July 1791, Buckingham County, Virginia, died 13 February 1876, Morgan County, Kentucky, buried in old cemetery, near Grassy Creek, Morgan County, Kentucky.  Joseph Carter, Jr. was the son of Joseph Carter, Sr. and Magdalene Chastain, daughter of Rev. Rane Chastain and Ann Ford.  The Chastains, Fords, and Carters were from Buckingham County, Virginia.[32]  

           
POLLY (MARY) SCOTT, born about1799,[33] Montgomery County, Kentucky, death place and burial place not known, married [34] 16 July 1817, Shelby County, Kentucky, Samuel Mahurin, born about 1796,[35] Shelby County, Kentucky, died [36] about 1842,  probably Parke County, Indiana, burial place not known. Samuel Mahurin was eldest son of Othniel Mahurin.  Samuel's mother was not known

DORRIS (Darris) GREEN SCOTT, born about 1801,[37] Montgomery County, Kentucky, died [38] 1846 or 1847, Salt Creek Township, Jackson County, Indiana, burial place (cemetery not known) Salt Creek Township, Jackson County, Indiana, married [39] 29 July 1821, Washington County, Indiana, Nancy Lucas, born [40] 1798, Kentucky, died after 1870 census, Salt Creek Township, Jackson County, Indiana, burial place (cemetery not known) Salt Creek Township, Jackson County, Indiana.   Nancy (Lucas) Scott was daughter of Jesse and Mary Lucas, Sr. who migrated from Kentucky in the 1820’s to Washington County, Indiana, and then into Jackson County, Indiana. 

            Dorris’ middle name "Green" appeared on his Jackson County, Indiana land purchase from the Northwest Territory Jeffersonville Land Office.[41]  Also, his middle name, “Green”, was written on the Executor’s Settlement of his deceased father’s estate.[42]    His middle name supports Wesley G. Scott’s memoirs that Winifred’s maiden name was “Green.”    

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KENTUCKY DOCUMENTS ON ROBERT SCOTT

            Since Robert was born in 1760, Scotland, per Wesley G. Scott’s memoirs, he migrated with his brother, Archelaus, and other relatives from some eastern port into what was Virginia territory and now is known as the domain of Kentucky.  No date is available as to when Robert and Archelaus Scott sailed from Wales, Scotland, or England to America, nor is a port of entry available.

            The earliest document was Archelaus Scott’s military service in Captain Daniel Smith’s Company of Fincastle Militia.  Archelaus Scott and James Scott were privates in rank, engaged in Lord Dunmore’s War, 1774.[43]  Nothing is definite about the person, named James Scott, nor his connections to Robert Scott and Archelaus Scott.  Fincastle County was created by Virginia laws from 1772-1776.  It included what is now Kentucky.  Fincastle was carved out of Botetort County, Virginia in 1772.  Fincastle lost its entire territory and name when it was divided in 1776 to form Kentucky County, Virginia; Montgomery County, Virginia; and, Washington County, Virginia.[44]   Each county was eventually included in what is now Kentucky today, so when the Fincastle Militia was organized, Archelaus Scott was residing in one of the earliest Kentucky settlements. His birth date about 1753-1758 was presumed from a comparison with his brother, Robert Scott's age, who according to Robert's Will was born 1760.  When Lord Dunmore's War of 1774 occurred, Robert Scott would have been 14 years old, and Archelaus would have been older, at least 16 years of age in order to qualify for competency as a soldier.  His brother, Robert Scott, did not qualify for military service at age 14.  Records of enlisted men in the Fincastle Company have revealed a “Robert Scott” who held the rank of Ensign[45]  but it was not likely a 14 year old would have been given such rank!    

            One may speculate that Robert Scott resided between 1772-1776 with relatives in another Virginia county other than Fincastle while his brother, Archelaus, migrated to Fincastle County, Virginia and while there, he enlisted in the Fincastle militia.  Or one may speculate that Robert Scott in 1772-1776 was in Fincastle County with Archelaus and remained “safe” in a homestead location during the war.

1789 Fayette County,  District of Kentucky, State of Virginia Tax List[46] -- (This tax list was created in the same year that Woodford County, Kentucky was created from Fayette County, Kentucky.)  Moses Scott, Archelis Scott, Robert Scott were listed together but separately from other Scotts named in this vast territory of Fayette County.  Moses & Archelis’ taxations were recorded on June 4, 1789; Robert Scott’s taxes were recorded on June 5, 1789.  William Harmon and Thomas Harmon were in same tax district as Robert, Moses, Archelis Scott. Robert’s Scott’s second marriage was to Abagail Eliza Harmon, daughter of William Harmon. 

The earliest Kentucky residences of Robert, Archelaus, and Moses Scott occurred in 1789 which at the time was Fayette County.  But, in 1791 that area of Fayette became Woodford County, Kentucky,[47] where the first Presbyterian settlement was located in 1783-84 by William Scott and his son, William, at Mt. Pisgah Church, 5 miles east of Versailles (county seat) on the Shannon Road.  This was an early Scotch-Irish settlement[48] and the Scotch-Welsh brothers, Robert Scott, Archelaus Scott, and Edward Scott (who was affiliated with Archelaus and Robert in correlated land purchases described below) were taxed in 1791, Woodford County, Kentucky!  The first tax list for Woodford County, Kentucky occurred in 1790[49] and included (1) David Scott, above 21 in age, 1 tithable white male above 16 and under 21 in age, 1 black male under 16 and above 12 in age; (2) William Scott, 1 white male above 21 in age, 1 tithable white male above 16 and under 21 in age, 1 black male above 16 in age, and an illegible number for black males between 12 and 16 in age; (3) John Scott, 1 white male above 21, 1 tithable white male above 16 and under 21 in age, 5 black persons among the age categories, and 5 horses; (4) Charles Green, 1 white male above 21 in age, 1 tithable white male above 16 and under 21 in age.

General Charles Scott from Virginia, who would later become Governor of Kentucky, also took residence in the 1780's at Versailles, Kentucky, where he chose to reside among all other Kentucky options granted for his military service by the state of Virginia

1791 Woodford County, Kentucky Tax List[50] -- The Scott and Green persons who paid taxes in the first book, presumably tax district one, with no entry date for payment or assessment were Archelaus Scott, Robert Scott, Edward Scott, Jacob Scott, William Green, James Green.  These same individuals were also named in Tax District Commissioner Book Two as well.  Also, Commissioner Tax Book Two had no dates for assessment or payment. Those included in Book Two were Archelaus Scott, Robert Scott, Edward Scott, General Charles Scott, Jacob Scott, William Green, James Green, Thomas Harmon, William Harmon.  Commissioner Tax Book Three included the following:  James or Janes Scott, illegible given name, William Scott, Charles? Green, John Green.  Robert Scott’s first wife, Winifred Green's families were probably among those Green individuals who were taxed. 

1792 Thru 1795 Woodford County, Kentucky Tax Lists[51] -- (Taxation years are in parenthesis) (1792 Commissioner Tax Book Two) - assessments for November 27 were Robert Scott, Robert Harmon; assessments for December 1 were Archibald Scott (possibly miss-spelling for Archelaus Scott), Moses Scott, Edward Scott, Jacob G.? Scott; assessments for December 4, William Harmon; assessment for September 18, William Green; assessment for September 27, General Charles Scott; assessment for October 3, James? Green; assessments for July 24, William Scott whose name appeared in Tax Book One and Tax Book Three:  (1793) - tax lists were incomplete and no Scotts recorded; (1794) - Archibald Scott, Robert Scott, Edward Scott; (1795) - Archibald Scott, Moses Scott. 

 These taxation records have confirmed Wesley G. Scott’s memoirs that Robert Scott and his brother, Archelaus Scott, were in Woodford County when on June 1, 1792, President George Washington signed the Act which made Kentucky the 15th state in the Union, separate from Virginia.  This was a significant memory of Kentucky pioneers!  Robert Scott, Archelaus Scott, Moses Scott, and Edward Scott were taxed in Woodford County, Kentucky from possibly 1790 but definitely from 1791 thru 1795.  The Green families in their proximities to the Scotts of Woodford County cannot be overlooked as possible relatives of Robert Scott’s wife, Winifred. 

The Woodford County tax lists from 1792 through 1795 has indicated the presence of an Archibald Scott and Edward Scott.  Even if Archibald and Archelaus Scott’s names were interchanged in tax spellings, an Archibald Scott was among early Kentucky Scott families.  See Appendix C for more information on a known Archibald Scott.   

            1795 Thru 1799 Clark County, Kentucky Deed Books[52] -- Robert Scott, Archelaus Scott and Edward Scott have purchased Clark County land in 1795, 1796, and 1797 from Thomas Vivion, son of John Vivion Sr.  (The Vivion Family was originally from Virginia.)  Archelaus Scott’s land was always taxed in Clark County records; however, Robert Scott and Edward Scott’s taxed Clark County land soon became the domain of Montgomery County, Kentucky when it was newly created 1 March 1797.  Edward Scott’s land eventually became the domain of Bath County when Bath was newly created 4 February 1811.  Robert Scott’s land remained within the Montgomery County domain.  What was clear, however, was that Archelaus, Robert, and Edward Scott all moved simultaneously and directly from Woodford County, Kentucky into Clark County for land purchases.     

            Moses Scott, presumed son of Archelaus Scott, married in 1798[53] Clark County, Kentucky receiving upon marriage some of his father’s property.  Moses and Rachel (Hardy) Scott were on the Clark County Tax Lists from 1799 thru 1802 before immigrating to Warren County, Kentucky with Rachel Hardy’s family.   Archelaus Scott moved to Shelby County, Kentucky in the mid or late 1800s following his days in Clark County and Woodford County.  Also, Robert Scott would immigrate to Shelby County between 1802 and 1811 from Montgomery County.

          1800 Montgomery County, “Second Census For Kentucky” based on tax lists - This “Second Census for Kentucky” was not based on an enumeration of residents but was a gathering of county tax lists or those assessed property taxes and this census did not show age categories for citizens.  After Montgomery County, Kentucky was formed March, 1797, James Scott and John Scott, sons of Robert Scott, reached the age of 21.  They became tax payers in 1804 and were recorded as adjacent to one another in some tax listings between 1804 through 1809 and they paid taxes on the same date.[54]

            When Robert Scott's daughter, Margaret, married Thomas Ferrell on January 4, 1804, the marriage bond [55] explicitly said, "Margaret Scott, daughter of Robert Scott of Clark County, Kentucky."  Robert issued an affidavit saying that "he could not come out to see the county clerk", James Bullock, "and he hoped that he would give Margaret and Thomas Ferrell lawful and sufficient license for marriage."  James Scott, Robert's son, gave deposition that the affidavit naming Margaret Scott, daughter of Robert Scott of Clark County, Kentucky was a writing of Robert's act and deed.  In the winter of 1804, Robert Scott was unable to travel to Winchester, Kentucky, Clark County Courthouse for his daughter's marriage.  In 1804, Robert Scott had Clark County, Kentucky resident status; but, most of his land had been reclassified as property in Montgomery County, Kentucky.

            Thomas Ferral was listed in the 1800 Clark County, “Second Census for Kentucky, based on tax lists. On July 16, 1806, Thomas and Margaret (Scott) Ferral first paid property taxes to Montgomery County and they resided in Aaron Hall’s District.  Aaron Hall was a Montgomery County Tax Commissioner.  Robert Scott and his sons, John and James Scott, along with Edward Scott resided in the same district.  They paid their taxes on July 15, 1806.

As documented previously in this paper, Robert Scott, Archelaus Scott, and Edward Scott, according to the proximity of land purchases and tax lists, were migrating together from Woodford County, Kentucky into Clark County, Kentucky where Edward and Robert Scott’s land would become in 1797 the new domain of Montgomery County, established from Clark County in 1797.  Edward Scott’s land would later become in 1811, the new domain of Bath County, Kentucky, established from Montgomery County in 1811.[56]  Robert Scott, Archelaus Scott and Edward Scott had purchased Clark County land in 1795, 1796, and 1797 from Thomas Vivion, son of John Vivion Sr.  The Vivion Family of Virginia had purchased their land from James French, a wealthy land owner who came from Virginia.  James French called his Kentucky land a “plantation” in his Kentucky deed transactions.  His land was surveyed and known locally as the Vivion-French domain.  Some of that domain was purchased by Robert, Archelaus, and Edward Scott. 

In 1799, Archelaus Scott paid his last taxation in Clark County, Kentucky and continued taxation payments in 1800 at Woodford County, Kentucky where he resided before relocating to Shelby County, Kentucky near Mt. Eden with his brother, Robert Scott.  Robert resided on his original Clark County land; but, apparently the largest portion of his land was now in the domain of Montgomery County.  Some small part of Robert’s land evidently remained in Clark County per the affidavit and bond document upon his daughter, Margaret Scott’s marriage.  Following the death of his wife, Winifred, Robert Scott moved to Shelby County, Kentucky between 1802 and 1811. Robert Scott not only owned his land in Montgomery County during this period but he also had some residence in southeastern Shelby County, near his brother, Archelaus Scott.  In Shelby County, Kentucky, Robert and Archelaus were once again common landowners in the same proximity.  Edward Scott stayed the rest of his life on his original Clark County land that had been transferred into the domain of Montgomery and then Bath counties upon their establishments by the Kentucky legislature.

            From 1800 through 1811, Edward and Robert Scott resided in the same tax district according to the Montgomery County Taxation Records.  Taxation records which Nelson Scott researched included the microfilm documents that covered the years 1797-1812 per footnote above and the County Clerk Tax Assessment Records based on information gathered by the County Commissioners.[57]  The Commissioners submitted their information in books to the County Clerk.  Each book submitted identified tax payers dwelling in neighborhoods over a certain domain of taxation.  The books named the number of white males in a household who were 21+ in age or between 16 and 21 years of age; the number of black persons over 16 and total number of black persons; land acreage; number of horses; the quality of the land was graded with a “1” for low grade; “2” for medium grade; “3” for high grade; and, the stream or river by which the land was drained.  The microfilm documents sometimes included the name of the original surveyor and the name of the first land owner.  Robert Scott paid a poll tax on one white male, 21+ in age, and another white male between 16-21 in age from 1800 thru 1808; from 1809 to 1811, he paid taxes on 1 white male 21+ in age.  The taxation of his sons, James, John, and Moses Scott corresponded rather well in this time period when they first reached the age of 21.

            The Commissioners Books described Robert and Edward Scott’s land as being in the same neighborhood. The microfilm indicated that their land originally belonged to James French.  From 1800 through 1811, their land was drained into Slate Creek, a meandering waterway from southeast of Mt. Sterling, Kentucky and running through Bath County to Licking River.  Robert and Edward Scott were listed with the Shults-Schultz families, the families from which Robert Scott’s eldest son, James, would marry Elizabeth Schultz about 1803, Montgomery County.  James Scott newly married first appeared in the Commissioner’s Book on June 1, 1804, adjacent to his brother John Scott who also was listed as a property owner, duly assessed and taxed. James and John Scott in 1804 were assessed on land that was in the neighborhood of Andrew Swearingin, Montgomery County Clerk, who did the county wide assessments.   From 1800 through 1803, Robert Scott’s assessed land was typically 300 to 500 acres; but, after James and John Scott were listed with their assessments beginning from 1804 through 1809, Robert Scott’s assessed acreage was zero. In 1810, Robert Scott was assessed 100 acres on Slate Creek.  Robert and his sons, John and James Scott, were not listed in the 1810 Montgomery County Census, yet in 1810, they were assessed for property in the county.  From 1806 through 1810, Robert Scott was assessed for 2 black persons who correlated with black persons named in Robert’s Last Will & Testament.  After 1810, Robert Scott was no longer assessed property in Montgomery County.  After 1812, his son, John Scott, was no longer assessed property.  Nelson Scott did not research taxation records in Montgomery County after 1812.  Though James Scott was not listed in taxation records from 1810-12,  James and Elizabeth Schultz Scott were in the 1820 Montgomery County Census listed below which corresponded perfectly with the age categories of their children.  So, it is presumed that James Scott was in Montgomery County from 1812 through 1819.  James and Elizabeth moved about 1827 to Clark County, Indiana. Robert Scott moved from Montgomery County between 1804 -1811 to Shelby County, Kentucky following the death of his wife, Winifred (Green) Scott.

            In 1811, Edward Scott’s land was reclassified as belonging to the domain of Bath County, Kentucky.     

            Edward Scott household, 1810 U.S. census, Montgomery County, Kentucky, page 368, line 4; National Archives micropublication M252, roll 7:  Edward Scott,  3 males, ages 1 to 9; 1 male, age 10 to 15; 2 males, age 16 to 25, 1 male +45 (Edward Scott); 2 females, ages 1 to 9; 2 females, ages 10-15; 1 female, age 26 to 44 (wife). 

Edward Scott household, 1820 U.S. census, Bath County, Kentucky, Owingsville Township stamped page 218, line 4; National Archives micropublication M33, roll 16:  Edward Scott, 1 male 45+ (no other persons listed in his home) but, also on page 218, line 7 was James Scott, (presumably a son of Edward Scott); 4 males, ages 1 to 9; 2 males, ages 10 to 15; 1 male, age 26 to 44; 2 females, ages 1 to 9; 1 female, age 10 to 15; 1 female, age 16 to 25; 1 female, age 26 to 44.  Neighbors were Absalom Hughes; Wm. Stephens; Samuel Patrick; Robert Pitman; Jonas Fortner; Tim Carrington.   

James Scott household, 1820 U.S. census, Montgomery County, Kentucky, No Township Listed, stamped page 604 or unstamped page 115, line 14; National Archives micropublication M33, roll 25:  James Scott (son of Robert Scott), age 26 to 44, 2 males, ages 1 to 9, 2 males, ages 10 to 15; Elizabeth, age 26 to 44, 1 female, age 10 - 15, 2 females, ages 1 to 9.  A nearby neighbor was Levi Farel, possibly a relative of James’ brother-in-law, Thomas Ferrell.  James and Elizabeth (Schultz) Scott resided for at least 25 years in Montgomery County on either his  father’s property or perhaps on property owned by Elizabeth Schultz’s parents/family until they moved about 1827 into Silver Creek Township, Clark County, Indiana where they were in the 1830 Clark County, Indiana Census.

Montgomery County lost land when Bath County was formed, February 4, 1811.  Edward Scott’s property was then in the new domain of Bath County along Slate Creek.   Nelson S. Scott presumes that since James Scott’s property was likely in some of the domain of his father Robert Scott, and since James Scott’s land stayed in Montgomery County but Edward Scott’s land was removed to Bath County, then the original land of Edward and Robert Scott was near the point where Slate Creek flows at the boundary of Bath and Montgomery counties.  Edward Scott’s home was in Bath County; but, James Scott’s home, the old home place of his father, was in Montgomery County yet Edward and James Scott resided near one another!            

Edward Scott probably died between 1820-1830 and was buried in either Montgomery or Bath County, Kentucky.  Nelson Scott has not researched the Edward Scott family other than the information shared above.  Edward’s wife was not known and no marriage records were researched.   It may be pure coincidence that Edward Scott was in proximity of Archelaus Scott and Robert Scott because nothing definite has been found to connect Edward as a precise relative to the two Scott brothers!  Scott families were in early Bath County records after 1812.  They had notable Scott names as Elias Scott, John Scott, James Scott and those persons were not within Archelaus and Robert Scott’s children. These common Scott names probably evolved through Edward Scott’s children or grandchildren. 

SHELBY COUNTY, KENTUCKY DOCUMENTS ON ROBERT SCOTT

            Robert Scott’s Last Will & Testament and Estate Settlement records and the marriage record of Robert and Abagail Eliza (Harmon) Hedden in Appendix A were the most important Shelby County, Kentucky documents. Robert Scott was not listed in the 1810 Kentucky Census for Montgomery County nor Shelby County.  His land documents were cited only in Shelby County Tax Lists as they were in Montgomery County Tax Lists, except Robert Scott was listed in 1800 Montgomery County, “Second Census For Kentucky” which was based on tax lists.

            No deed has been found for Robert Scott’s purchase of his Shelby County property. But, upon his death, his property was sold without problems regarding his ownership.  Lewis Harmon purchased his farm and when he resold it, the land was described as noted below.  The Shelby County, Kentucky tax lists from 1811- 1816 named Robert Scott with zero acres on Quist Creek watercourse where Wm. Harmon’s land was listed similarly, father of his second wife, Abagail.  In the year 1811, Robert Scott, zero acres, was recorded in the tax list adjacent to his brother, Archelaus Scott, 160 acres, Beech Creek.[58]  In 1812, Robert married Abagail and was cited in the 1812 tax list with zero acres.  In 1813, a second “Robert Scott” appeared in the tax list who had married 9 September 1813, Catherine Reddish.[59]  He was the son of Moses Scott, Sr., Pastor of the Beech Creek Baptist Church, Shelby County, Kentucky. Robert & Catherine (Reddish) Scott’s property transactions were traced through county tax lists and deeds so they could be separated from taxations and deeds named for Robert & Abagail Scott.  

            From 1817 - 1824, Robert and Abagail Scott’s property taxations were consistently designated as 140 acres, Beech Creek, and the taxation records then indicated that his land was originally surveyed by Roberts/Purvis.  In 1819 and 1820, Robert’s taxation records were listed adjacent to George Shindler, father of Elizabeth Shindler, wife of Robert’s son, Moses Scott.[60] From 1817 - 1824, Robert & Abagail’s property taxations were typically recorded under the name of Robert Scott, Sr., and Robert & Catherine Scott’s taxations were recorded under the name of Robert Scott, Jr. so the tax assessment officials could distinguish between the two similar names. In 1820 and 1822, Robert & Abagail Scott paid their property taxes two years in advance and were not recorded in the tax list for 1821.  However, they were recorded in 1823 even though they had paid in advance in the preceding year.  They were living in 1820 in Jackson Township, Washington County, Indiana where they were named in the 1820 Washington County Census.  It is believed by this researcher, Nelson S. Scott, that Robert’s daughter, Mary “Polly” (Scott) Mahurin and her husband, Samuel, were living on Robert Scott’s Shelby County property per the 1820 Shelby County Census.[61]

            In 1824, Abagail Scott was named in the tax list with 140 acres on Beech Creek with an assessed value of $1,180.00.  Adjacent to her assessment was Doris G. Scott, zero acres.  She and Doris G. Scott were new entries in the tax records.  Robert Scott was now deceased and the property assessment was listed with Abagail Scott and her step-son, Doris G. Scott. 

            In 1825, Abagail Scott was again named in the tax list but with zero acres, $540 assessed valuation.    Doris G. Scott was not listed.  In 1826, Abagail was not listed because the Estate of Robert Scott, deceased, was finalized with distribution of its assets including the land. [62]        

            Upon Robert Scott's death, Lewis Harmon purchased Robert’s property for $205.00 per the Bill

of Sale.[63]  Lewis Harmon lived on this farm until 6 April 1832 when he sold it to Michael Ritter.[64]  Lewis Harmon’s sale deed for Robert Scott’s old farm indicated that it was on land which drained into Beech Creek, located at Mahurin’s Corner.  “Mahurin’s Corner” was a reference to Othniel Mahurin’s home and property who was a witness to Robert Scott’s Last Will and Testament and Othniel’s son, Samuel Mahurin, had married [65] Mary (Polly) Scott, daughter of Robert & Winifred Scott.  This researcher has concluded that Robert Scott’s farm was southeast of Shelbyville and north of Little Mount, Kentucky near the county border between newly established Spencer County in 1824 and Shelby County.

            Robert Scott also owned 183.25 acres in Indiana.[66]  His Will stipulated that the certificate for the Indiana land be taken out of his office by son John Scott and sold with the proceeds equally divided among all the children.[67]  This sale of his Indiana land, however, was not included by his Executor, Mr. James C. Burnett, in the Settlement of Robert Scott’s estate at the Shelby County Courthouse on 16 May 1826.[68]   The Executor, James Burnett, could not include Robert’s Indiana property in the settlement because Robert had specified in his Will that the patent certificate for the property be given to his son, John Scott.  John Scott would hold the certificate and sell the land when appropriate for the best interest of Robert Scott's children.  Until at least 1826 when Robert Scott’s Estate Settlement was finalized, his widow,  Abagail, and youngest son, Dorris Green Scott's family resided on the Indiana land in Section 19, Township 1 South, Range 5 East.  This site is presently in the domain of Greenville Township, Floyd County, Indiana.  

            A narration about Robert Scott’s Indiana settlement is documented in the following resear      

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INDIANA DOCUMENTS ON ROBERT SCOTT

            Archelaus and Robert Scott explored the Northwest Territory (Indiana) and like the pattern in Kentucky, they purchased their first Indiana land in adjacent sections to one another.

            Robert Scott and his sons, Moses and John Scott, and Robert’s brother, Archelaus Scott along with his sons, Harmon and David Scott, journeyed presumably to Indiana around the summer of 1814 or earlier to explore new land available in the Northwest Territory.  This exploratory trip was not mentioned in family lore but in the historical records of the Northwest Territory early pioneers were rarely irresponsible about relocating their families in sites that were not previously seen and explored, especially agricultural families like the Scotts.    They needed to see the lay of the land, the springs, the streams, the special forests that opened to tillable soil that would be more prosperous to their way of life.  They took inventory of mother nature and the most accessible routes, waterways, and trails.  On their exploratory trip to the Northwest Territory, these Scotts and other friends in Shelby County, Kentucky had two travel options on their exploratory trips.  One option was to travel over the knobs north of New Albany or the other option was to travel northward using the Silver Creek Valley along Silver Creek between Clarksville and New Albany, traveling as far north as present day Bennettsville, Clark County, Indiana.  From Bennettsville, they went west along the border lands between what would become the Clark and Floyd Counties boundaries through the high lands south of Borden, Indiana, traveling as far west as Martinsburg, Indiana along the old Bear Creek Trail where Washington and Floyd County now intersect.  Bear Creek Trail runs atop the Wilcoxen Cave. The Scotts especially explored land in southeast Washington County.  Back then, this path contained only Clark and Harrison County domain and newly established Washington County on January, 1814.  Floyd County was not established until 1819.  

          The second option explorers followed was to leave the Ohio River Falls at Clarksville traveling northwest over the Old Vincennes Trace or Buffalo Trail towards Galena and Greenville and Palmyra, Indiana.   Both the old Bear Creek Trail and Vincennes Trace/Buffalo Trail came together between Martinsburg and Palmyra, Indiana.  Wesley G. Scott’s memoirs have led descendants to believe that the Scotts eventually brought their families up the Old Vincennes Trace, veering north near present-day Floyds Knobs or present-day Galena to reach north central Floyd County and then going west into southeast Washington County to the Bear Creek Trail.  Nothing was definite about which option was taken for the exploratory trip.  Both options eventually became a major passage way for pioneers moving into Washington, Orange, Dubois, Davis, Pike and Knox (Vincennes, IN) counties.  During this exploration trip they discovered lands which they would soon purchase before their families would arrive. They probably visited the Jeffersonville Land Office for additional information on land they had explored and then returned to Shelby County, Kentucky.     

            The migration of Robert Scott and his brother, Archelaus Scott, is documented below.

            Robert Scott household, 1820 U.S. census, Washington County, Indiana, No Township Listed, stamped page 223 or unstamped page 327, line 50; National Archives micropublication M33, roll 14: Robert Scott, age 45 & up; 1 male, age 16 to 25; 1 female under 10; 1 female, age 10 to 15; 1 female, age 26 to 44, wife Abagail.  Two were in agriculture.  Robert Scott's only unmarried child, Dorris Green Scott, was included as the male son, age 16-25.  The female children were not known.  This part of the census contained the earliest Jackson Township residents who dwelled in Section 19, Township 1 South, Range 5 East and Section 24, Township 1 South, Range 4 East along the Bear Creek Trail near the upper part of the Vincennes Trace and also contained neighbors in the Martinsburg, Indiana settlement. 

            Harmon Scott and David Scott, sons of Archelaus Scott, whose census records are listed below resided adjacent to Robert Scott on Bear Creek Trail.  Other neighbors to Robert Scott were Moses Harman; Jacob Harmon; Robert Evans; Jacob Motsinger; Alexander Watts(Watty); George Short; Susannah Spurgeon.  

Harmon Scott household, 1820 U.S. census, Washington County, Indiana, No Township Listed, stamped page 224 or unstamped page 328, line 37; National Archives micropublication M33, roll 14Harmon Scott, age 19 to 25, wife, Margaret (Reasor) Scott, age, 19 to 25; 1 son under 10.  Their first born child, James H. Scott, was born 16 April 1820, so the census correlated precisely for Harmon and Margaret (Reasor) Scott.  This census applied to old Jackson Township residents living in Section 24, Township 1 South, Range 4 East.  Harmon Scott's census dwelling was on 80 acres which his father, Archelaus, sold on December 24, 1822, in Jackson Township, Washington County, Indiana, West ½ of Southwest ¼ , Section 24, Township 1 South, Range 4 East.[69]

Wesley G. Scott's memoirs clearly stated that Harmon Scott arrived at Scottsville, Lafayette Township, Floyd County, Indiana in 1824.  After his father sold his Jackson Township property in 1822, Harmon moved in 1823 to what would become later the Scottsville settlements where he lived briefly on the land of his cousins, John Scott or Moses Scott. Harmon Scott also owned a town lot in Taylorville, Kentucky[70]  through 1826 which at that time was in the domain of Shelby County, Kentucky.  When Spencer County was formed in January, 1824, Taylorville became the county seat of Spencer County.  Harmon paid taxes on his Taylorville lot in 1825 and 1826.  He may have owned property in Taylorville earlier than 1823 when it was in Shelby County.  On July 19, 1824, Harmon Scott of Spencer County, Kentucky sold 61 acres in Shelby County near the fork of Crooked Creek for $61.00 to Ralph Phillips of Huntendon, New Jersey. [71]  The deed indicated that Phillips sold to Harmon and then Harmon sold it back.  Harmon and wife, Margaret Reasor Scott, obviously returned to Shelby County, Kentucky following the 1820 Washington County, Census.  While there, his property became Spencer County, Kentucky.   His wife, Margaret Reasor’s family, resided in Little Mount, Spencer County, where they may have lived for a few years with her family.  Harmon returned to the Scottsville area between 1826 - 1830.  He eventually purchased 76 acres from Wm. McCutchan and wife, 7 September 1831, West ½ of Northwest ¼, Section 30, Township 1 South, Range 6 East. [72]

David Scott household, 1820 U.S. census, Washington County, Indiana, No Township Listed, stamped page 223 or unstamped page 327, line 49; National Archives micropublication M33, roll 14David Scott, age 19 to 25; wife, age 16to 25, 1 son under 10, 1 daughter under 10.  David Scott was the son of Archelaus Scott. This census correlated perfectly with David’s birth, 1798, and the birth of his first born children -- Barsheba Scott, born 1819 and Archelaus Scott, born 20 May 1820.  David Scott’s log cabin was adjacent to his uncle, Robert Scott, in Section 19, Township 1 South, Range 5 East.  David Scott married [73]  Peggy (Margaret) Bunton on 30 October 1817, Washington County, Indiana.  According to Archelaus’ 1810 Shelby County Kentucky Census, David would be 16 or 17 years old when married

Researchers will also be interested in a second “Robert Scott” who resided near Martinsburg, Indiana, Jackson Township, Section 1, and was named in the 1820 Federal Census, Washington County, Indiana. The second “Robert Scott” has been listed below because he may be a relative to the brothers, Robert and Archelaus Scott.  There is a possibility that he may be the son of Archelaus Scott who was named in Wesley G. Scott’s family lore

Robert Scott household, 1820 U.S. census, Washington County, Indiana, No Township Listed, stamped page 223 or unstamped page 327, line 8; National Archives micropublication M33, roll 14(The second named “Robert Scott” in Section 1, near Martinsburg, Indiana):  Robert Scott, age 26 to 44, wife, age 26 to 44, 2 sons under 10, 1 daughter under 10.  This Robert Scott lived north of Martinsburg, Washington County, Indiana, according to his deed history.[74]  He married Susannah Urmy, daughter of Jacob Urmy.[75]   Robert Scott died 7 February 1828.[76]  His burial was located in Jackson Township, Scott Graveyard where his monument stone indicated that he died 1828, age 46, born 1782; his wife, Susannah Urmy Scott was buried next to him and her monument stone indicated that she died 1830, 34 years old, born 1796.  One other burial stone in the Scott Graveyard was that of Mary Phillips, died 13 January1839, 66 years old, born 1773.[77

The Scott Graveyard was located on an old road going east across bottom lands and connected with the Pekin - Greenville Road which today is known as Voyles Road.  Grace S. Marks wrote:  “In 1941, the road east was virtually discontinued.  Frederick Phillips first entered land in Section 1 and was presumably related to Mary Phillips.  Pieces of decayed wood were scattered about the hillside of the graveyard as though there must have been an old building there at sometime.  A Dunkard Church was believed to be in this locality or it may have been the home of the Scotts or Phillips families.” 

Susannah Urmy Scott was listed in the 1830 Washington County Census: 2 males under 5; 2 males 5-9, 3 males 10-14, 1 female 10-14, Susannah Scott 30-39.  She lived near her father Jacob Urmery[78] who was still alive in 1830 census.  Jacob Urmery died August, 1831. The estate of deceased Robert and deceased Susannah Scott’s probate records[79] named their children as follows:  Jeremiah Scott, Nathan Scott, Hester Scott, James Scott, David Scott, Cyrus Scott, and Washington Scott.  Jeremiah Scott and Nathan Scott being over 14 years of age made their choice of guardian, Jonathan Urmy, who was the brother of their mother, Susannah Scott.  It is presumed that when Jeremiah and Nathan Scott made their choice of guardianship that the other children were placed under the care of Jonathan Urmy, too, though they were not old enough to choose a guardian.  The probate record, however, did not include them by name as being under Jonathan Urmy’s guardianship.

Jacob Urmy's sons, Anderson & Jacob Urmy, relocated to Jackson County, Indiana.  They both were in 1840 Jackson County, Salt Creek Township Census, living near Freetown, Indiana.  Jacob Urmery, Jr. resided in Salt Creek Township near Dorris G. Scott's family, the son of Robert Scott, brother to Archelaus Scott.  According to the 1830 Washington County census, Dorris G. Scott and Jacob Urmy, Jr. were close neighbors in the Martinsburg, Indiana settlement and were also close neighbors at Freetown, Indiana

In the 1860 Washington County Census, Jackson Township, Household # 305, James Urmey, 43, born Virginia; wife Susannah, 45, born Virginia;  and all 6 children were born in Indiana (19 thru 4 years of age).  Since the Urmey family came from Virginia, then Robert Scott and wife Susannah Urmy and her father Jacob Urmy were all likely residing in Virginia, too.  If more research revealed that the Urmy family migrated from Virginia, it might direct everyone in the right direction to research the Scott migration from Virginia to Kentucky.   Wesley G. Scott’s memoirs mentioned that Robert Scott, the brother of Archelaus Scott, came from Richmond, Virginia before coming to Kentucky.  Also, folklore indicated that Robert Scott once returned temporarily to Virginia for some unknown reason while living in Kentucky.  But, nothing definite has been found in this researcher’s work to locate documents about this branch of the Scott family passing through Virginia!

It is ironic that Robert and Susannah Urmy Scott settled near Martinsburg, Indiana at the same time and in the same neighborhoods of Archelaus Scott along with his sons, David and Harmon Scott, and, in the same neighborhood of Archelaus’ brother, Robert Scott.  Robert and Susannah Urmy Scott’s settlement makes researchers want to presume that he was the mysterious Robert Scott of Virginia, son of Archelaus, known only from family folklore.  That Robert Scott’s birth in 1782 per the Scott Graveyard and his 1820 Washington County Census correlated well with ages for children born to Archelaus while residing 1777 - 1792, Fayette County, District of Kentucky, state of Virginia; and that Robert Scott came from Virginia with the Urmy families; and that they settled near one who could be Robert’s father, Archelaus Scott, are correlated truths which can support the family lore.  Nothing is definite; but it offers a strong presumption that he was related in some manner to the brothers, Archelaus and Robert Scott.

Archelus Scott household, 1820 U.S. census, Washington County, Indiana, No Township Listed, stamped page 201 or unstamped page 305, line 4; National Archives micropublication M33, roll 14Archelus Scott, age 45 + ; wife, Barsheba, age 45 +; 1 male, age 16 to 18; 1 male, age 16 to 25; 1 female, age 16 to 25; two males were in agriculture, residing in Washington Township, Washington County, Indiana, on 320 acres, what is now State Highway 60, about 2 miles southeast of Salem, Indiana.[80]  Archelaus Scott resided next to Alexander Huston, Assistant Marshall, who was responsible for taking the 1820 Washington County Census.  Other neighbors were: ?? Hattabaugh; Benjamin Hamilton; Richard Day; Wm. Glasebrook; Wm. McKnight; Robert Lemmon; Shaman Harrad; Wm. Chambers; John Dunlap; Henry Garnett.  At this location, he was not far from his wife’s family, the James B. Mahorney family.  Also, as mentioned above, Archelaus owned land in Section 24, Township 1 South, Range 5 East, Jackson Township, Washington County where his sons, Harmon Scott and David Scott resided, along with his brother, Robert Scott.  See Appendix B for Archelaus Scott’s Northwest (Indiana) Territory land purchase. 

Archelaus Scott was the first teacher who taught in the first school house erected in 1816, Pierce Township, Washington County, Indiana.  It was built in Section 14, Township 1 North, Range 4 East near where the Motsinger schoolhouse stood about ¼ mile northwest of Pekin, Indiana near Shorts corner.[81]   

            Records of Washington County Indiana Commissioners have named the following Scott persons:  [82]  In the year 1819, Archelaus Scott, Robert Scott, and James B. Mahorney were ordered by the Commissioners to serve as jurors throughout the year of 1819; on 8 May 1820, David Scott, Archelaus Scott’s son, was appointed constable for Washington Township, Washington County, Indiana;  in the year 1822, James Dickson was appointed overseer of the Jeffersonville road beginning one half mile of the Salem Court House to the middle fork of Blue River; then Archelaus Scott was appointed overseer of the Jeffersonville, Indiana road from the middle fork of Blue River to Archelaus’ lane; then Robert Evans was appointed overseer from Archelaus’ lane to the Clark County line; on 15 May 1822, David Scott, Archelaus Scott’s son, was appointed constable for Jackson Township, Washington County;  in January 1823, the commissioners appointed Archillis Scott as lister for Jackson Township (a title for listing residents for taxation or voting purposes); on 12 May 1823, the commissioners reappointed David Scott constable in Jackson Township; in 1823, the commissioners appointed Archellus Scott to serve on petit juries for 1823; in 1823, commissioners reappointed Archillus Scott as Jeffersonville Road overseer as mentioned above; in July 1823, Robert Scott resigned as Justice of the Peace in Jackson Township, (presumably he was the elder Robert Scott, spouse, Abagail, and brother of Archelaus Scott.  Presumably, he was not the younger Robert Scott, wife, Susannah Urmy, who resided in Section 1, Martinsburg, Indiana.)

            Robert and Abagail (Harmon) Scott’s 1820 Washington County Indiana Census was on land that Robert had purchased (See Appendix B), 183.25 acres, at the Jeffersonville Land Office, Jeffersonville, Indiana.  This land was located in Section 19, Northwest ¼, Township 1 South, Range 5 East and later became the present-day property of Floyd County, Indiana.  This researcher, Nelson Scott, did not find any other date for later credit payments on this land, so Robert Scott paid the total amount for the land on 10 October 1816.  If he made later payments, he probably completed them by the same time that his brother, Archelaus Scott, completed his credit purchase, 29 December 1817.  Both Robert Scott and Archelaus Scott had obtained ownership of their land before the 1820 Federal Census.  Robert Scott’s ownership of his land was guaranteed by the fact that he was issued a patent Receipt # 10893 and that receipt verified ownership and was recorded in the Jeffersonville Land Office Registry Receipts Books.

            Robert’s 1820 census included a single male whose age category was precisely correct for his son,  Dorris Green Scott.  Dorris Green Scott was born about 1801, Montgomery County, Kentucky married 29 July 1821, Washington County, Indiana, Nancy Lucas, born 1798, Kentucky.[83]  Nancy Lucas’s parents, Jesse and Mary Lucas, were close neighbors in 1820 to Robert and Abagail Scott on Bear Creek.

            Federal Census Records:  Jesse Lucas household, 1820 U.S. census, Washington County, Indiana, No Township Listed, stamped page 224 or unstamped page 328, line 32; National Archives micropublication M33, roll 14:  Jesse Lucas, 1 male under 10; 1 male age 10 to 15; 1 male, age 19 to 25; 1 male, age 45+, Jesse himself; 1 female under 10; 1 female age 10 to 15; 2 females, ages 16 to 25 (includes daughter Nancy Lucas); 1 female age 45+, Mary Lucas, 3 in agriculture.

            Dorris Scott household, 1830 U.S. census, Washington County, Indiana, No Township Listed, page 281, line 23; National Archives micropublication M19, roll 31: 1830 Washington County, Indiana:  Dorris “G. or C.” Scott (male, 20-29 age); Nancy Scott, (20-29 age); 2 males, (10-14 age); 1 female, (5-9 age); 1 male and 1 female, (under 5).  Note: Neither of the 2 oldest males in household were Dorris and Nancy's children.  They were born 1816 - 1820 before their marriage.  But, all other children listed in age categories correlated well with this family.

            1840 Jackson County, Indiana Census:  Dorris G. Scott, 2 males under 5; 1 male of 5 under 10; 1 male of 10 under 15; 1 male of 15 under 20; 1 male of 30 under 40; 1 female under 5; 1 female of 5 under 10; 1 female of 10 under 15; 1 female of 40 under 50.  4 persons employed in agriculture.  See Appendix B for the relocation of Dorris G. Scott into Jackson County, Indiana.

            After the death of Dorris G. Scott’s father, Robert Scott, Dorris and Nancy (Lucas) Scott bought land in Washington County north of Martinsburg, Indiana about 3 to 4 miles north of the Bear Creek settlement where his father, Robert Scott, had resided in Section 19.  But, there was no deed record between 1824-1830 for Dorris’ purchase in Washington County, Indiana.  Also, Abagail Scott, widow of deceased Robert Scott, was listed in the census below.  She was residing in the same area of Dorris Green Scott.  But, there was no deed in Washington County for Abagail Scott’s new location.  The 1830 Census record for both Abagail and Dorris Green Scott has indicated that they were residing near Martinsburg, Indiana.  If they were in Section 19 in 1830, they would have been recorded in the 1830 Floyd County Census. On 5 January 1828, the Indiana Legislature removed Sections 19 and 24 from Harrison County to Floyd County, Indiana.[84]  It is presumed by this researcher, Nelson S. Scott, that Robert Scott’s land was sold by his son, John Scott, between 1826 - 1830, per instructions given to John Scott in Robert Scott’s Will; but, no sale deed has been found in Harrison, Washington, Clark or Floyd counties per their Recorder Offices.    

            Abagail Scott household, 1830 U.S. census, Washington County, Indiana, No Township Listed, page 330, line 5; National Archives micropublication M19, roll 31: Abagail Scott, 1 male of 5 under 10; 1 female of 30 under 40; 1 female of 50 under 60.  At this residence, located between the towns of Martinsburg and Old Pekin, Indiana, Abagail died in April, 1831.[85]     

            In concluding research on Robert Scott’s entry on 10 October 1816, 183.25 acres, Northwest, Section 19, Township 1 South, Range 5 East, this researcher gives accolades to the New Albany Museum (New Albany, Indiana) for its commissioned research to obtain the names and locations of the very first Floyd County land owners.  This research of the New Albany Museum has recognized Robert Scott’s entry as the first settler in Section 19.  Section 19 has some noted history.  Geographically, the land is high in altitude and its watershed is Bear Creek. Bear Creek actually originates in Section 19 where its watershed begins and flows westward through the land of Robert Scott’s settlement.  

            Today, the north border of Robert Scott’s settlement is Washington County, Indiana where Bear Creek Road is laid along the north border of his settlement.  Floyd County, Indiana is responsible for the maintenance of Bear Creek Road which serves as an east-west road for connecting State Highway 335 on the west side with the Voyles Road on the east side.  The Voyles Road is a north-south county road that connects Greenville, Indiana with Pekin, Indiana in Washington and Floyd County.  State Highway 335 is a north-south highway that connects Greenville, Indiana with Salem, Indiana, Washington County.  State Highway 335 was laid on parts of Archelaus Scott’s property of 80 acres, West ½ of Southwest ¼ , Section 24, Township 1 South, Range 4 East.  Archelaus sold this land on December 24, 1822.   It was ¼ mile south of Bear Creek and ¼ mile southwest of Robert Scott’s land in Section 19. 

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APPENDIX A

Documentation:  No records have been found for Robert Scott and Winifred Green’s marriage.  The following documents were for the marriage of Robert Scott and Abagail Eliza Harmon Hedden:  (1) The Kentucky Historical Society Register, Marriages Shelby County, Kentucky, Volumes 23 (1925), 24 (1926), and 42 (1944), a typed list at Frankfort, Kentucky, derived from ministers who returned information about their officiated marriages.  Their entry said, “Robert Scott, father Hestra, to Eliza Harmon, father, Wm. Harmon, dated 29 September 1812;  (2) Shelby County, Kentucky Marriage Records (1792-1830),  Shelby County Courthouse.  The marriage record at the courthouse said Robert Scott and Abagail Harmon, dated 30 September 1812;  Also a consent document with bond was posted, 29 September 1812, signed by Robert Scott and William Harmon giving his mark as her father; on consent bond, Abagail was first listed as “Abagail Heddy,” and then “Heddy” was scratched over and “Harmon” was listed above it. Rev. John Mavity of Shelby County, Kentucky, ordained Christian Church pastor, officiated the wedding.  Rev. John Mavity served in the Indiana Christian Church Conference. [86]   He moved to Washington County and later to Dubois County, Indiana (3) Undated typescript “Kentucky, Shelby County Early Marriage Records”, copied from original records at Shelby County by Mrs. J. N. Cunningham and Mrs. Graham Lawrence, Kentucky State Historical Society Library, Frankfort.

Documentation:   Robert Scott’s Will recorded in Shelby County, Kentucky Will Book 6 (1824), page 233:  Shelby County Kentucky:  August Court 1824.  In the name of God,  Amen.  I Robert Scott Junior of Shelby County and State of Kentucky being of sound mind and memory but weak in body and in the 64th year of my age, calling to mind that it is appointed unto all men to die do make and ordain this my last Will & Testament in manner & form as follows: First, I give & bequeath to my loving wife Abagail Scott my bay mare Simon and two cows and two feather beds, furniture, and as much more of the household and kitchen furniture as she may think is necessary for her to keep house with.  Also, it is my will that my wife have my negro girl Easter for the term of ten years from the time of my death to hire her out or keep her in her own employ as she may think proper.  And after the expiration of ten years, it is my will that the said Easter be sold in my family by some one of my children purchasing her by agreement or by sale, and the money equally divided among all my children but she is not to be sold out of the family.  Also it is my desire that the farm that I now live on together with the balance of my property not given to my wife be sold on a credit of two years and the money arising there from divided as follows:  My son James Scott to have $20.00;  my daughter Margaret Ferrell $40.00;  my daughter Elizabeth Carter $40.00; my son Darras Scott $40.00; my daughter Polly Mahurin $40.00; and the balance if any to be divided among all my children.  Also I desire that the Certificate for my land in the State of Indiana be taken out of the office by my son John Scott and sold and the money equally divided among all my children.  I further make and ordain James C. Burnett, Executor of this my last Will and Testament.  In testimony hereof, I have here unto set my hand this 13th day of April 1824. 

            Signed Robert Scott.   Witnesses:  James C. Burnett and Othniel Mahurin.

            Probate Entry, page 234.  Shelby County August Court 1824.  His Will was offered for probate with James C. Burnett appointed Executor.  Probate document was as follows:  A writing purporting to be the Last Will and Testament of Robert Scott Jen deceased was produced in court whereupon James C. Burnett and Othneal Mahurin, two of the subscribing witnesses to said writing, being duly sworn, state that said writing was signed, sealed, acknowledged and delivered by the said Robert Scott’s signature as “x” for his last Will and Testament and that they believe that the said Robert was of sound disposing mind and memory at the time of doing the same.  Which writing is ordered to be recorded and on motion of James C. Burnett who having taken upon himself the business of the Execution thereof and having taken the oath required by law and entered into bond with Othneal Mahurin his security in the penalty of $600.  Conditioned as the law directs probate of said Will is granted him in due form of Law. 

            ATT:  Ja. L. Whitaker, Ck. S.C.C.

            NOTES ABOUT THE WILL:  Robert Scott’s Will transcribed by the court listed him as “Robert Scott Junior” and the Probate record listed him as “Jen” which may be a court “short-hand” procedure to distinguish this Robert Scott from another Robert Scott who resided in Shelby county at this particular time. If this was the point of  “Junior” and “Jen” in the above documents as other researchers have believed in Court records, then it was not to suggest that his father was named Robert, too.

            Robert Scott's Will identified all children except his son, Moses Scott, who nevertheless signed a receipt following the Sale and Settlement of Robert’s estate (see "Estate Settlement" below) which indicated that Moses, too, received his inheritance. Ethel Faye York, descendant of this family, saw several receipts among the settlement papers in the Shelby County Courthouse in the 1970’s and Moses’ name was recorded in the Executor’s Settlement document submitted to the court.  Robert Scott’s second wife, Abagail, by virtue of this Will had no title to any of Robert Scott’s land.  Robert Scott effectively removed her from “Dowers Rights” when issuing the Will.  Otherwise if he had died intestate she would have been automatically due 1/3rd of husband’s property if he failed to “Will” it otherwise. Othniel Mahurin witnessed Robert Scott’s Will.  Robert’s daughter, Polly (Mary) Scott, married Othniel’s eldest son, Samuel Mahurin.   

Documentation:  Robert Scott's Estate Settlement, Bill of Sale, Shelby County, Kentucky Settlement Book 6, page 248,  October Court 1824; Executors Settlement Book 7, page 140, June Court 1826, Shelby County, Kentucky.

            The Bill of Sale named the following persons who purchased items from Robert Scott’s estate sale:  Abagail Scott; Samuel Mahurin (husband of his daughter, Mary Polly Scott); Joshua Richardson; James Gray; John Grafton; Zachariah Terrell; John McAllister; John Mitchell; Edward Harris; Othniel Mahurin; Elisha Hedden; Henry Tilley; John Fink; and Lewis Harmon. Lewis Harmon purchased Robert Scott’s land and buildings for $205.00.

            The Executor’s final payments from the estate’s assets were given as follows:  paid $7.72 to John Blevins for balance due on a note; paid $7.25 to Dr. Nowaid or Noward, physician, for medical services; paid tax ($2.22) for the year, 1823; paid $4.00 for some unknown fee; paid $12.00 to John Mitchell for making the coffin for Robert Scott’s burial; paid $2.00 for whiskey for the estate sale; paid $2.00 to the appraisers; paid $25.00 to Executor for personal services; paid $4.00 to the court for fees; paid $42.50 to Thomas Ferrell for wife’s legacy; paid $50.00 to Samuel Mahurin for wife’s legacy; paid $54.00 to Dorris Green Scott for his legacy; paid $54.00 to Joseph Carter for his wife’s legacy; paid $14.00 to John Scott for his legacy; paid $22.50 to James Scott for his legacy; paid $14.00 to Moses Scott for his legacy.  After making these payments, the Executor informed the court that he had a balance of $33.95 ½ cents in the Estate Account for distribution.  The balance was probably distributed among the legatees but no other court documents were available for that distribution.

            Lewis Harmon witnessed several receipt vouchers in Robert Scott Estate Settlement.  He signed a receipt for money due to Elizabeth Carter, daughter of Robert Scott and then there was a receipt signed by Joseph Carter, Jr. as receiving the money from Lewis Harmon.        

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APPENDIX B

DOCUMENTATION:

Janet C. Cowen, compiler, Jeffersonville Indiana Land Office Entries (1808 - 1818), a document in the Indiana State Library and New Albany - Floyd County Public Library, Indiana Room, which recorded pioneers buying land in the Northwest Indiana Territory before 1820 when credit payments were allowed on land purchases

JEFFERSONVILLE LAND OFFICE: TRACT BOOKS AND REGISTER OF RECEIPTS(CASH) FROM 1820 TO 1854.  Indiana State Library(Archives), Indianapolis, Indiana.  Microfilm, Tract Books 2, 3, & 4.  Receipts for federal government (patented) land purchases in the Northwest Indiana Territory presumably reflect entries in the Tract Books.  The Tract Books recorded purchaser's name, date purchased and, land location.  The Registry Receipts Books add other information about the purchaser's residence at time of purchase, amount paid, and a receipt number given when land was paid in full.  Nelson S. Scott did not research all Tract Book entries for receipts; but, some receipt numbers are listed below.

Credit Purchases

Before 1820, government land could be purchased on a credit plan.  After 1820, the government sold Indiana Territory land only for cash.  Before 1820, most pioneers chose the credit method by making annual payments.  Robert Scott, Archelaus Scott and, Christopher Shultz made credit purchases. Indiana State Archive librarians caution researchers not to conclude that “Credit” purchases were always paid in full.  There were entries for “credit” purchases that were attempted with down payment but not necessarily resulting in final ownership until payments were made in full.  Credit entries could have been disrupted before everything was paid in full.    Extenuating circumstances may have disrupted payments, requiring partial refunds.  

Robert Scott, Northwest, Section 19, Township 1 South, Range 5 East, purchased 183.25 acres.  On October 10, 1816, residence in Clark County, Indiana, he began credit purchase.  He was in Registry Receipts Books, Receipt # 10893, which indicated that he completed payments for full ownership of this land in Section 19, Township 1 South, Range 5 East.  At the time of Robert Scott's entry Section 19, Township 1 South, Range 5 East and Section 24, Township 1 South, Range 4 East (adjoining sections) were in Harrison County, Indiana.    But, Harrison County officials never recognized Section 19 nor Section 24 due to the poorly described county boundaries between Harrison, Clark and Washington County.  Both sections were enumerated in 1820 by Washington County census takers who believed that sections 19 and 24 were the domain of Washington County, thus they were entered in the 1820 Washington County, Indiana Census.  On 5 January 1828, the Indiana Legislature removed these sections to Floyd County, Indiana. [87]  For example, Robert Scott appeared in the 1820 Washington County, Indiana census, but, he was actually residing in Section 19 of Harrison County, Indiana.  Robert Scott's household census included the correct age category for another male who was his son, Dorris Green Scott.  Dorris Green Scott married 29 July 1821, Washington County, Indiana, Nancy Lucas, born 1798, Kentucky.[88]  Robert Scott’s Section 19 land was duly recorded in the New Albany Museum as one of the original property owners of Floyd County, Indiana.[89]

Archelaus Scott, 320 acres, East ½, Section 27, Township 2 North, Range 4 East, located in Washington Township, Washington County, Indiana which today is on Highway 60, 2 miles southeast of Salem, Indiana.  His down payment on these 320 acres began 28 December 1816 with final payment on 29 December 1817.  He was in Registry Receipts Books, Receipt #11482, which indicated he completed payments for full ownership.[90]  When applying for this purchase, he said that his residence was Shelby County, Kentucky. 

             Also, Archelaus had other Washington County, Indiana land.  On December 24, 1822, Archelaus Scott of  Jackson Township, Washington County, Indiana sold 80 acres., West ½ of Southwest ¼ , Section 24, Township 1 South, Range 4 East, adjoining John Duvaco, south side, and adjoining Frederick Watty’s, (Waddy) land.[91]   No Washington County, Indiana deed was found when he purchased it; but, his son, Harmon Scott was listed on this property in the 1820 Washington County, Indiana Census.  No deed has been found in Washington County, Indiana for Harmon Scott selling or buying land in Section 24.  At Section 24, Archelaus Scott and son, Harmon Scott,  resided less than 1/4 mile from the site of Robert Scott's land purchase.  Robert Scott was listed in 1820 Washington County, Indiana Census among other folks in Sections 19 and 24 who were known to reside there.  Washington county earliest census record and earliest deed records claimed Sections 19 and 24 as being in Jackson Township.  In July 1823, Robert Scott resigned as Jackson Township’s Justice of the Peace.

             In 1820, Archelaus Scott owned land in Section 24, Jackson Township, and 320 acres in Washington Township.  His 1820 Washington County, Indiana Census indicated that his home was located on the 320 acres in Washington Township and the home of his son, Harmon Scott, was on Archelaus’ property in Section 24, Jackson Township.

             Archelaus Scott and his second wife, Clarissa Scott, purchased 40 acres, NW-SE, Section 25, Township 1 South, Range 5 East, on 15 December 1832. [92]   This property was approximately 1/2 mile from his son, Harmon Scott's home, near the village of Scottsville, Floyd County, Indiana.  At this residence, Archelaus Scott died.  A few days before his death, [93] he and his wife, Clarissa, sold this land on 3 July 1834 to Thomas Wilson, Clark County, Indiana.

C. Shultz, Section 36, Township 1 North, Range 4 East, purchasing 160 acres, located in Washington County, Indiana between Martinsburg and Pekin, Indiana.  On 23 December 1818, he began a credit purchase, not cash!  Christian Schultz was not in Registry Receipts Books, only Tract Books, which may indicate that he did not complete payments for this Washington County land!  Christopher Shultz was the father of Elizabeth Schultz who married Robert Scott’s eldest son, James Scott.  Christopher Shultz resided in Montgomery County, Kentucky, and migrated to Washington County, Indiana, named in census and deed books!

Cash Purchases

John Brock, Jackson County, Indiana, Receipt 13433, Section 5, Township 6 North, Range 4 East, 41.98 acres, purchased 4/3/1837, $52.47. (John Brock married Matilda Scott, daughter of Robert Scott's eldest son, James Scott)

Dorris Green Scott, Jackson County, Indiana, Receipt 13434, Section 6, Township 6 North, Range 4 East, 48.55 acres, purchased 4/3/1837, $60.00; Also, Receipt 16736, See. 7, Township 6 North, Range 4 East, 47.58 acres, purchased 1/11/1839, $59.47 ½

(John Brock and Dorris G. Scott have consecutively numbered receipts on same date of land purchase, 4/3/1837)

In the late 1830’s Dorris Green Scott and wife, Nancy Lucas, moved from Washington County, Indiana, to Salt Creek Township, Jackson County, Indiana. 

            Floyd, Harrison and Washington County, Indiana deed records, particularly those records open to the general public (researchers believe some older county deed and plat books were sometimes “hidden away in court house basements” or have been misplaced by early Title Companies) but those records available to the general public contained no sale of Robert Scott’s Indiana land.  His patent certificate of ownership, receipt # 10893, was named in his Will as his Indiana land and was given to his son, John Scott, to sell and distribute the proceeds equally among Robert’s children.  No records were available as to when any of its acreage was sold.  During the 1820’s, the Indiana state legislature gave Harrison County domain over Section 19.  But, Harrison County officials never recognized it due to the poorly described county lines within this section that was adjacent to Clark and Washington County boundaries. According to research determining the first land-owners of Floyd County,[94] Robert Scott was the only person who owned land through 1820 in Section 19.  He built one of the first log cabins on Bear Creek, northwest of Greenville, Indiana.  By the 1830’s more settlers had arrived in Section 19.  Quoting from Mrs. Grace Sutherlin Mark:  “Section 19 is listed in three counties; Clark, Floyd, and Washington Counties.  This is that portion of the Bear Creek Trail that runs atop the Wilcoxen Cave and forms the boundary line for two miles between Floyd and Washington Counties.” [95]  In Grace Marks' research, she also reported that “all the first records of Harrison County excepting the Will Records and Marriage Records are missing.” [96]   Grace Marks reported all entrants to Section 19 as follows:   

            Earliest Clark County Entries:  1837--Millard Ingram; 1838--Bernard Conway; 1839--John B. Ford, NE ¼, 160 acres.

            Earliest Washington County Entries:  Frederick Wyman and Moses H. Martin

            Earliest Floyd County Entries:  1833--Washington Riddle, NW-SE ¼, 40 acres; 1837--Frederick Wyman, West ½, Northwest ¼, 91 acres; 1837--Moses H. Martin, two 45 acre tracts in Southeast & Northwest of Southwest ¼; 1839--Benjamin Wilcoxen, 40 acres, Southwest, Southeast ¼.

APPENDIX C

Archibald Scott was an early inhabitant of Fayette County and Woodford County Kentucky, noted in 1792 through the 1795 Woodford County Tax List.  One of his children was James Scott, married to Julia (surname unknown).  James and Julia Scott lived in Shelby County, Kentucky. They owned 80 acres on Bullskin or Bullrun Creek.  James died intestate, February 3, 1822, property/slaves appraised. [97]  He was born March 4, 1785.  Julia died June 8, 1856.  They are buried in Scott Cemetery, Shelby County.  James Scott was the eldest son of the late Rev. Archibald Scott of Virginia.  James' death was reported in "Kentucky Reporter" Lexington newspaper, dated March 4, 1822, indicating his deceased father’s name and origin from Virginia

Federal Census Record:  1820 Shelby County, Kentucky, page 159:  James Scott, 26-44 age category; 1 male, 10-16; 1 female, 26-44 (Julia Scott).  James and Julia Scott were presumed to have one son, James Scott, Jr., who owned land adjacent to his parents for a brief period of time according to Shelby County, Kentucky tax lists

Also, in History of Kentucky, Volume III  by Johnson, Archibald Scott was mentioned as the only son of Robert and Julia (Lyle) Scott from Fayette County, Kentucky.     

Nothing definite can be gained from this research except a presumption that Archibald Scott, father of James Scott, was reared in Fayette County, Kentucky by his parents who were originally from Virginia. Archibald Scott was an early minister in Woodford County, Kentucky whose son James Scott resided in Shelby County.  Archibald Scott’s parents were Robert and Julia (Lyle) Scott of Fayette County, Kentucky

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APPENDIX D

Cuthbert L. Scott II and his son, C.L. "Bert" Scott III:  Earliest typewritten copy of  Wesley G. Scott's oral history obtained from Hannah and Levi H. Scott through their daughter, Berla Esther Scott Stamper.  Their document is written below with footnotes.  

Numeric footnotes refer to:  The DAR, Piankeshaw Chapter, Genealogical Records Committee, “Bible Records and Family Records, pages 163-174", referencing Wesley G. Scott's memoirs.

Alphabetic footnotes refer to: Mrs. R. H. Konig, R.R. 3, Box 520, Carmel, California 93923, her document referencing Wesley G. Scott's memoirs.  John Scott, father of Wesley Scott, was Mrs. Konig's great-great-great grandfather.  Mrs. Konig's document only contained oral history regarding her great-great-great grandfather, John Scott.  

Alphanumeric footnotes begin with "B" for Lennie R. Berkey’s document (B1, B2, etc.).  The footnotes refer to the old paper, copied in 1955.  Some material Berkey omitted and re-arranged.  Berkey’s document was named, "Scott:  A Pioneer Family of Kentucky and Indiana" by Wesley G. Scott.  Berkey's material was then recopied by Helen Burgess in 1969 and placed in the Salem Public Library, Salem, Indiana. 

The earliest manuscript of Cuthbert L. Scott II and C. L. Scott III is typed below with corresponding footnotes for the other named manuscripts.  Variations between the manuscripts are observable by the footnotes.        

                                                                                  New Albany, Indiana 1-12-1906

The Scott Family:  A Pioneer Family of Kentucky and Indiana

by Wesley G. Scott          

            John Scott, my father, was born in Woodford County, Kentucky 1781, married to Anna Reasor, 1-11-1813, in which state his children Emily and Reasor Scott were born.  Coming to Indiana while it was still a territory, coming as far as the Ohio River, no navigation or boats, having to cross the river in his own canoe.  Bringing his wife and children the first load then returning to obtain the household goods or belongings.  In marching up the bank he found nothing but laurel growing where the city of New Albany is now situated.  The first residents he saw was a cabin owned by a man named Whittaker what is now called the Laden Farm.  There he left his family for a few days.  Taking his gun he traveled through the forest 10 or 12 miles north.  There he built himself a cabin.  The nearest neighbors he had was a man by the name of Lewis, who lived in what is now called Borden, Clark County, Indiana. His little cabin was surrounded by deer, wolf, bears, and panthers. 

            A while after he established himself in his home.  There was a company formed in Shelbyville, Kentucky by Captain Allen.  A skirmish by the Indians began at what we now call Petersburg, which lasted two days in which they buried 160 Indians.  The burial ground remains to be seen a few miles from Petersburg.  They drove the Indians to Pigeon Roost where they had considerable battle.( A )

            Sometime after this there was an election held to vote whether this should be a free or slave state.  The election was also held at Lewis' in Jefferson District.  John Scott, clerk of the board, presided.  The entire vote cast in the district was 360.  Out of that 60 for slavery and the remainder for free state.  Not being familiar with the exact date, I am taking this from my father's records. 

            The first President he ( 1 ) voted for was Thomas Jefferson being 20 years old.  He placed 21 leaves in the bottom of his shoes saying he was over 21.  He was a life long democrat voting from Jefferson to Buchannan.  He was also one of the men that helped raise the state house at Corydon, Indiana.  After the boundary line was settled and the counties laid off, he took a claim of 160 acres of government land which was patented at Jeffersonville, Indiana.  His claim being in Floyd County.  Afterwards this was thrown into townships.  He was elected magistrate in 1825, served 10 years.

            After coming to this country ( 2 & B ) there were born to them eight boys and two girls, making 10 in all, named as follows:

            Reasor married to Elizabeth Dunbar from North Carolina, Emily married to David Beggarly from Virginia, Robert to Rhoda Thompson from Kentucky, ( C ) James H. married to Barbra Miller from Indiana.  Vardemon married to Elizabeth Smith from Kentucky  John A. ( 3 & D ) married to Marion ( 4 & E )  Beggarly from Virginia, Herbert married to Nancy McKinley a second cousin of President McKinley, ( B1 )  Wesley G. married to Rebecca McClintock from Kentucky.  David married to Mary Furgeson from Indiana. ( F )  Elizabeth married to Thomas Akers from Virginia.  ( 5 & B2 )

            John Scott was married by his father Robert Scott a Baptist Minister who was born in Scotland 1721, leaving Scotland and going to Wales from there to England, back to Wales marrying Winifred Green in 1740, (6 & G & B3)    moving then to where the city of Richmond Virginia now is located.  After this moving to Woodford County, Kentucky then died in 1818.  His father named Herbert Scott ( B4 ) was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1667, married a woman of Saxon race by the name of Mary Vardemon.(7  & 8 & H)   He was a brother of Walter Scott, father of Sir Walter Scott.  Robert Scott of history was a grandfather of Sir Walter Scott.  David Scott, the artist of history, was the father ( I )  of Eliha (Elijah), the brother of the Baptist Minister spoken of.  Winfield Scott's forefathers ( J ) residing in Scotland, scattering, some moving to Maryland, others to Virginia where he was born, and became an officer in the United States Army.   

            ( 9 ) The sons of Eliha (Elijah) were Harmon, Moses, Robert and John.  Harmon Scott settled in Indiana, Moses and John settled in Kentucky, Robert remained in Virginia.  ( 10 ) John Scott was president of a college in Kentucky where Benjamin Harrison, ex-president received his education.  Afterwards Benjamin Harrison marrying John Scott's daughter Caroline Scott, settling in Ohio, was governor.  Then became President of the United States.  Afterwards his wife died.  In a few years he married another Scott, relative of his first wife.

             ( 11 )   Walter Scott, as spoken of,  is the first man in history who clearly taught the place and design of baptism for the remission of sins.  Walter Scott went to Edinburgh and entered the university where he remained until the completion of his college course.

            In 1818, we find him in America acting as assistant teacher in the city of Pittsburgh in association with Geo. Forrester, a devout and loving Scotchman.  The subsequent career of Mr. Scott and the particulars of his place, and power in the current reformation, must be studied in the larger treaterises of his life and work of Baxter, Richardson and others.  The following brief estimates will answer the purpose of this pictorial glimpses, "next to my father he was the most cordial and indefatigable fellow laborer in the origin and progress of the present reformation.  He was a powerful and successful advocate of the Lord Messiah."

            "I knew him well:  I knew him long:  I have loved him much" -- Alexander Campbell on the death of Walter Scott

            In view of its sublime and far reaching revelation, its cogent logic and still more striking analytical division and just discriminations, the literature of the reformation seems to me to grow very pale and dim. "I have never come in contact with a man more largely and deeply versed in the holy scripture."  Some of the most valuable thoughts that have given form, clearness and force to our plea and have become current among us had the origin with Walter Scott, the very Cheralier Bayard of the reformation, a star of wondrous brightness in our galaxy of great men was this kingly pioneer herald of the restoration.  It is true that to him more than to any other man should be ascribed the rescue of the Scripture foundation of the church, from the rubbish which had covered it during the ages of the Apostasy.

            After a brief illness of seven days "Walter Scott truthfully and peacefully fell asleep in Jesus.'  At Mayslick, Kentucky, April 23, 1861.  His last words were concerning the Gospel of Christ and the honor of fellowship with the herald of the cross. In the village graveyard his remains were laid to rest but for thirty six years his resting place was unmarked.  In November 1897 a monument was erected which cost $262.  This amount was raised by popular subscriptions through the columns of the "Christian Guide" and chiefly by the efforts of Walter Scott Smith, grandson of Water Scott then the editor of the Indiana department of the paper.

            As we look upon the ripening grain in the field adjoining the great man's resting place and recall his abundant laborers and rich harvest of soles, one could fittingly appropriate the words, "Thou shalt come to thy grave in a full age like as a stalk of corn ascendeth in its season."

            Sir Walter, the son of Walter Scott the great novelist who was born in 1771, so early as 1805 before his great poems were produced, Scott had entered on the composition of Naverly.  The first of his illustrious progeny of tales, next came Marmion, the Black Dward, Old Mortality, Rob Boy, and the Bride of Lammermoor.  In 1820 he wrote the historical Romance of Ivanhoe.  The gaiety of Scott was the natural concomitant of kindly and uninterrupted industry.  The minds of poets, it is said never grow old.  And Scott was hopeful to the last.  Disease, however, was a pest, undermining his strength.  His last work of fiction, published in 1831 was a fourth series of tales of My Landlord, containing Counte Robert of Paris and Castle Dangerous.  They were written after repeated shocks of paralysis and apoplexy, and are mere shadows of his former greatness.  And with this effort closed the noble mind that had so long swayed the scepter of romance.  The public received the imperfect volumes with tenderness and indulgence as the farewell offering, the greatest of their contemporaries.  The last feeble glean of a light soon to be extinguished: --

            A wandering witch-note of the distant spell; and now tis silent all; Enchanter, Fare-thee well! 

            We may note the wonderful success of novels as a mercantile speculation.  At the time of his death his life insurance were realized there was still a balance due of 30,000.  This debt, the publishers of Scott's works, Mr. Cadell, ultimately took on himself receiving in return the copyright of the works:  And before his death in 1849, Mr. Cadell had set the estate of Abbots-ford free from encumbrance.  The poetry of Scott, too, seems equally popular, and there has been a keen rivalry among London publishers to re-produce editions in various forms.

            Sir Walter Scott known as one of the greatest novelist the world ever produced, died at his home in "Abbotsford Notanda" in 1832. 

            John Scott, my father, having three brothers, James, Moses, Darris Scott. 

            James marrying Elizabeth Shultz of German descent. ( 12 & B5 )  Born to them eight children, five boys and three girls namely:  Matilda marrying a Brock of German descent; Malinda marrying a Schryms from Virginia; Sarah married a Mann from Virginia; Robert marrying a woman by the name of Johnson;   ( 13 & B6 ) James  marrying a lady from Brunerstown, ( 14 & B7 )  Kentucky,  not familiar with the name.  He and his brother, Louis, formerly owned the Farmers' Hotel at Louisville, Kentucky; Peter leaving home in 1821 going to Arkansas ( 15 & B8 ) when a young man, marrying in that state; Samuel having died when about twenty one years old.( 16 & B9 )  

            James Scott, Sr. as stated above was one of the delegates at the Convention that framed the first Constitution of Indiana that met at Corydon, Indiana.  Then the capitol of the Indiana Territory and the first capitol of the state on June 10, 1816 and June 29, 1816 having completed its work.  It took but nineteen days to complete Indiana's laws.  A great deal of this work was done under the branches of a great Elm tree that stood upon the "Public Square" or State House grounds of Corydon.  And that great Elm has been historic, known as the Constitutional Elm.  It stands to this day.  The grandest landmark in the pioneer history of Indiana. 

            Moses Scott, a brother to James, marrying Elizabeth Shindler from Spencer County, Kentucky of German descent,  ( 17 ) leaving Kentucky and coming to Indiana in 1819, remaining in this state until his death which occurred in 1847.

            Born to them ten children, seven girls and three boys, namely:  America Scott marrying Wm. McCutcheon from Virginia; Malinda Scott, marrying Samuel McCutcheon from Virginia; Catherine Scott marrying Bell from Tennessee; Indiana and Louisiana, twin girls; Indiana Scott marrying Milo B. Stacy from Maryland; Louisiana marrying Jeremiah M. Packwood from Virginia; Elizabeth Scott marrying James McCutcheon originally from Virginia; Mary Scott marrying John Loweth from England, now residing in Corydon, Indiana; George Scott marrying Mary Hey from Ohio; Robert Scott marrying Carolyne Nickolson from South Carolina; Moses Scott marrying America Kelly from Clark County, Indiana.( 18 )

            Darris Scott coming to Indiana in 1823, settling in New Albany, building a grocery store where McDonald's Flour Mill now stands - in business for eight years or probably ten.( B11 )  Moving then to Jackson County near Brownstown, not familiar with family record.( 19 )

            The three sisters of my father were Elizabeth, Margaret, and Mary Scott.  Elizabeth married to Joseph Carter from Virginia in Spencer County, Kentucky, died in 1863.  Born to Elizabeth Carter six children, namely:  Franklin, Willis, and Joseph.  Also three daughters not familiar with the names. One of Elizabeth's daughters married a man by the name of Harrison.  Their son Carter Harrison was afterwards the ex-mayor of Chicago.

            Mary Scott marrying Frederick Razor ( 20 )  from Woodford County, Kentucky in 1819, settled in Spencer County and lived there until his death which occurred in 1842.

            Margaret Scott marrying Thomas Ferrel of Irish descent moving to Indiana in 1821, died in 1846.  Born to Margaret Scott six children, namely:  John, Clemens, Thomas, Pete, Sally, and Thena.  John died while a young man.  Clemens Ferrel marrying Elizabeth Thompson, Thomas Ferrel marrying Anna Galloway from Kentucky; Pete Ferrel marrying Jane Hollowell from North Carolina; Sally Ferrel marrying William Scott from Kentucky; Thena Ferrel marrying Michael Galloway from Kentucky. 

            ( 21 & B12 ) Daniel Reasor left Germany in a colony in 1730 ( B13 )  and coming to America settled close to Philadelphia, having several children.  The Indians at that time being very numerous.  A portion of the children left Philadelphia, settling in Kentucky where the Indians were driven back.  The eldest son, Michael Reasor, my grandfather, moved to Kentucky and settling in Spencer County, he married a woman from Pennsylvania in 1748.  Born to them nine children, five boys and four girls, namely:  Josiah, ( B14 ) James, Frederick, Daniel, Wm., Hannah, Anna, Sarah, and Margaret Reasor.

            Josiah ( B14 ) Reasor marrying Elizabeth Allen from Kentucky in 1806.  Born to them six children, namely:  Frederick, ( B15 )  Wm., Washington, Eliza, and Caroline Reasor.

            James Reasor marrying Elizabeth Nolan from Kentucky in 1814, born to them three children:  Amelia, Eliza, and Michael Reasor.

            Wm. Reasor, marrying Elizabeth Goss in Spencer County, Kentucky was a graduate from the Medical College at Lexington, Kentucky moving to Louisville., practicing medicine there for thirty years.  Born to them three children, namely:  James, William, and Mary Reasor.  James Reasor practicing law in Louisville, Kentucky. eighteen or twenty years, was elected Senator at the legislature in Frankfort, Kentucky in 1848, returning to Louisville in 1856, married Miss Goss and died in Louisville. ( B16 ) Wm. Reasor, ( 22 & B17 ) a druggist born in Louisville, was not married, died in 1859.  Mary Reasor married a man by the name of Freeman, a Baptist Minister, residing in Spencer County, Kentucky.

            Frederick Reasor, married Catherine Smith from Kentucky in 1815.  One son was born to them named Smith Reasor.  They came to Indiana in 1828, settling on what is now Dr. Ruthford's ( 23 & B18 ) Farm.  There he died in 1831.  His widow married Colonel Budd, settling in Franklin Township, which is known as the Budd Road leading to this farm.  Mr. Budd,  being a Colonel in the Mexican war, returned home and remained on his farm for a while.  Then moved to New Albany, Indiana where he died in 1839, his son marrying Anna Black from the same place.  .

            Daniel Reasor married Eliz. Pullem, ( 24 & B19 ) from Kentucky in 1818, moved from Kentucky to Indiana born to them six children named Paul, Wm.,  Michael, James, Daniel, and Mary Reasor. Paul Reasor married Elizabeth Rainy; Wm. married Nancy Thompson; Michael Reasor married Marguerite Bartlett; James Reasor unmarried; Daniel Reasor married Miss Grady; Mary Reasor married John Wilson.

            Hannah Reasor married Jackson Galloway from Kentucky coming to Indiana in 1819.  Born to them eight children named:  Michael, Samuel, Everette, Wm.,  John, Mahala, Eliz., and Anna Galloway.  Michael Galloway married Thena Ferrel from Indiana moving to Oregon and died there.  Samuel Galloway married Malinda Smith from Kentucky moved to Monroe County, Indiana in 1850. ( B20 ) Everette Galloway ( 25 & B21 )  married Nancy Smith from Indiana moving to Monroe County, Indiana where he now resides.  Wm. Galloway married Miss Nidy ( B22 ) from Iowa, moved to Oregon and died there.  John Galloway married a woman from Kentucky not familiar with the name, now residing in Oregon.  Mahala Galloway married Wm. McCutcheon ( 26 & B23 ) from Virginia, moving to Oregon and died there.  Anna Galloway married Thomas Ferrel from Kentucky settled in Indiana and died there in 1898. ( B24 )

            Sarah Reasor married Samuel McCutcheon from Virginia, born to them ten children, seven boys and three girls:  James, Wm., Larue, Joseph, Samuel, David, John, Anna, Fannie, and Sarah McCutcheon.  James McCutcheon married Elizabeth Scott; William McCutcheon married a woman in Arkansas where he now resides; Larue McCutcheon married Mary ( 27 ) Todd from Bartlettsville, Indiana; Joseph McCutcheon married a woman in Iowa, died in 1900; Samuel McCutcheon and David McCutcheon leaving Indiana in 1862 and settling in Kansas married there where they still remained; John McCutcheon married in Harrison County where he still resides; Anna McCutcheon married Willis Akers born near Greenville, Indiana, died in 1849; Fanny McCutcheon married Patrick Wilson from Virginia, settling in Clark County died in 1849; ( 28 )  Sarah McCutcheon married Marion Akers from Greenville, he having died in the Army.  The widow remarried and settled in Marion County, Indiana.

            Marguerite Reasor, my mother's sister, ( B25 ) married Harmon Scott in Spencer County, Kentucky in 1819, settled in Indiana in 1824, born to them six children:  James, Wm., Jeremiah, Elizabeth, Anna, and Martha Scott.  James Scott married a German woman by the name of Elizabeth Clem ( 29 & B26 ) in 1848, settled in Floyd County, born to them nine children, names as follows:  Mary, Barbara, Ella, Elizabeth, Clara, Wm., Harmon, James, and Madison Scott. (30 & 31 & B27 & B28)

            Anna Reasor marrying John Scott, my father which is spoken of in the beginning.

            These brief estimates above will answer the purpose "I trust for which it is intended."

THE DOCUMENTS LISTED BELOW CONTAIN

VARIATIONS FROM THE ABOVE DOCUMENT

The DAR, Piankeshaw Chapter, Genealogical Records Committee, “Bible Records and Family Records, pages 163-174.” 

1 - "He" is Wesley Scott's father, John Scott.  The first President for whom John Scott voted was Thomas Jefferson.

2- After coming to this territory

3 & 4 - John A. Scott married to Marmion Baggerly

5 - This documented added:  "Moses Scott married to Mary Pacton from Indiana."

6 - Marriage year 1740 was omitted from this document.

7 - Herbert Scott's birth place in Edinburgh, Scotland, birth year 1667, and wife's name, Mary Vardemon was omitted from this document.  David Scott is named as the father of Herbert Scott. 

8 - The following sentences in this paragraph regarding Walter Scott, Sir Walter Scott, Robert Scott of history, David Scott, Elijah Scott, Winfield Scott were omitted from this document.

9 - This document said that "My Grandfather Robert Scott, the Baptist Minister had a brother Elijah Scott whose sons were Harmon Scott, Moses Scott, Robert Scott, and John Scott.  Harmon in Indiana; Moses and John in Kentucky and Robert in Virginia."

10 - All sentences regarding John Scott, Benjamin Harrison, John and Caroline Scott were omitted from this document.

11 - All sentences regarding Walter Scott, the pioneer pastor who emigrated from Scotland to the United States, and regarding Sir Walter Scott's literary accomplishments were omitted from this document.

12 - Omitted Elizabeth Shult's German descent

13 -  This document said that Robert Scott married a woman named Shelton.

14 - This document said Brunenton, Kentucky.

15 - This document said Peter went to Kansas, married there.

16 - This document said "Samuel Scott died unmarried at 21."

17 - This document omitted Elizabeth Shindler's German descent.

18 - This document put Catherine Scott as the 2nd daughter, and Malinda Scott as the 5th daughter named. It did not classify Indiana and Louisiana as twins.  Carolyne Nickolson married a man from Carolina (no north or south mentioned for the state); Moses Scott is named as Moses Scott, Jr.

19 - This document names Darris as Dorris Scott, a brother of John Scott, Wesley's father.

20 - This document said "Mary Scott married Frederick Razor (Reasor)" ..... Reasor named in brackets

21 - This document introduces this paragraph with "I will now begin on my mother's side."  (Anna Reasor who married John Scott).

22 - This document omitted this reference to Wm. Reasor.

23 - This document said "Dr. Rutherford's Farm."

24 - This document said "Elizabeth Cullon."

25 - This document omitted any reference to Everette Galloway.

26 - This document said that Mahala Galloway married Gideon Adkins from Virginia and that Elizabeth Galloway married Wm. McCutcheon from Virginia, moved to Oregon and died there.

27 - This document had Nancy Todd

28 - This document confirmed that Fanny McCutcheon Wilson's death was in the same year as her sister, Anna McCutcheon Akers, both dying in 1849.

29 - This document had James Scott married a German woman by the name of Elizabeth Weaver.

30 - This document included additional information about James and Elizabeth Weaver Scott's children.  Born to them 9 children:

            (1)  Mary Scott married Henry Todd.  Children - Willard Todd; Ella; Mamie; Perry; Lou; Grover and Homer Todd.

            (2)  Barbara Scott married George Sarles.  Two children - Perry and Elihu.

            (3)  Ella Scott married David Goss.  2 children - Percy and Ethel Goss.

            (4)  Elizabeth Scott married Lewis Miller.  Had Claudia and Noble Miller.

            (5)  Clara Scott married Louis Wade; 5 children - Aldora; Ernest; Loslah; Fred and Vernon Wade.

            (6)  William Scott married a woman in Dubois County.  Children - Ida; Cleveland; Otto; Chester; Lilly; Ernest Scott.

            (7)  Harmon Scott unmarried.

            (8)  James Scott married Clarinda Ferrell.  Children - Madison; William; Nancy; and Ida.

            (9)  Madison Scott married Diantha Smith.  Children - Morton; Wayne; Cordelia; Mabel and Gertie Mae.

31 - This document also contained the following about Wesley Scott's wife and children.  "I will now continue with the family of Wesley Scott (the writer of this paper).  He married Rebecca McClintick and they had six children.

            (1)  Belle Scott married Julian Miller.  She did not live but a few years after her marriage and he married another sister.

            (2)  Eunice Scott married Julian Miller - 2 children, Raymond and Madge Miller.

            (3)  James Scott married Addie Norrington.  They had 3 children - Roy; a well-known heart specialist in Cleveland; Guy; Julius

            (4)  Jane Scott married James Scott.  She died several years after her marriage, leaving one son, Cuthbert, who was raised by her sister Hannah.

            (5)  Hannah Scott married Levi H. Scott and to them were born two children - Maude Scott and Berla Scott.

            (6)  Libbie Scott married Alexander Dean and to them were born four children:  Scott Dean, Douglas Dean, Juanita Dean and Lucille Dean.

                        a.  Scott Dean married Ada Railey.  Two children - Anna Marie and Scott E. Dean.

                        b.  Douglas Dean never married - died at 35.

                        c.  Juanita Dean married Fred P. Packwood and they had two children - George and Betty Jane Packwood

                        d.  Lucille Dean married Lee M. Roberts and had Doris Anna.  Lucille later married Fred M. Wade who had two children by a first marriage - Helen and Sharon Wade.  Fred Wade is the son of Clara Scott Wade.  Fred is the great grandson of Harmon and Marguerite Reasor Scott.  

 

Mrs. R. H. Konig, R.R. 3, Box 520, Carmel, California 93923  (John Scott, father of Wesley Scott, was Mrs. Konig's great-great-great grandfather)  Mrs. Konig's document only contained oral history regarding John Scott, her great-great-great grandfather.    

A - This document had "They drove the Indians to Pigeon Roost, where they had considerable battle in Scott County, Indiana."

B - This document had "After coming to this territory"

C - This document omitted "Robert to Rhoda Thompson from Kentucky."

D & E - This document had John A. married to Mariman Baggerly.

F - This document inserted Moses married to Mary Parton from Indiana.

G - This document had marrying Winifred Green in 1740.

H - This document had the same "His father named Herbert Scott was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1667, married a woman of Saxon race by the name of Mary Vardemon."

I - This document had "David Scott, the artist of history, was the son of Eligha, the brother of the Baptist Minister spoken of."

J - This document inserted "Winfield Scott's forefathers (Winfield was a cousin of Governor Charles Scott), residing in Scotland, scattering, some moving to Maryland, others to Virginia where he was born, and become an officer in the United States Army and died at West Point.) 

 

"Scott:  A Pioneer Family of Kentucky and Indiana" by Wesley G. Scott.  Old paper, copied in 1955, some material omitted and re-arranged by Lennie R. Berkey, Salem, Indiana.  Berkey's material was then recopied by Helen Burgess in 1969 and placed in the Salem Public Library, Salem, Indiana.  Lennie Berkey wrote the following annotation to this document:  Quoting from a letter from Lennie R. Berkey, December 1968, "I found that my nephew, Billy Martin at Martinsburg, Indiana had these old papers that belonged to his mother, who had been Mayme Akers (sister of Fern Knight and Bertha Mahuron, Jack Mahuron's mother).  They were in a mess and I copied them and tried to straighten them out.  Julian T. Miller gives Bible records, with dates, and is more reliable.  Wesley G. Scott was his father-in-law and seems to depend mostly on memory." 

B1 - This document added that Nancy McKinley was sister to Lennie Berkey's great-grandmother Brock.

B2 - This document added "Moses Scott married to ????? Pacton from Indiana."

B3 - This document omitted any year for the marriage of Robert Scott and Winifred Green.

B4 - This document omitted Herbert Scott's birthplace, birth year, and marriage to Mary Vardemon.  But, it did include with a question mark that David Scott was the father of Herbert Scott.  This document omitted the remaining sentences in this paragraph and all subsequent paragraphs, beginning where "John Scott, my father, had three brothers."  Lenny Berkey noted that he omitted those paragraphs because "It was an attempt to claim kinship with all the prominent Scotts in history -- Sir Walter, the writer; Walter Scott, the Restoration preacher and friend of Alexander Campbell; and Winfield Scott, the Army Officer.  Too vague. -- L.R.B.").

B5 - This document omitted Elizabeth Shultz being of German descent.

B6 - This document claimed that Robert Scott married a Shelton.

B7 - This document said "Brunenton" Kentucky

B8 - This document said that Peter Scott went to Kansas.

B9 - This document said that Samuel Scott died unmarried at age 27.

B10 - This document put Catherine Scott as the 2nd daughter, and Malinda Scott as the 5th daughter named. It did designate Indiana and Louisiana as twins.  Carolyne Nickolson married a man from South Carolina; Moses Scott is named as Moses Scott, Jr.

B11 - This document said "Dorris Scott, the other brother of my father came to Indiana in 1823, settling in New Albany.  He built a grocery store where the McDane brick flour mill now stands."

B12 - This document introduced the next paragraphs as follows:  "Tracing my relation on my father's side to my great, great grandfather, I will now begin on my mother's side."

B13 - This document claimed the colony of folks that came with Daniel Reasor to America left Germany in 1700.

B14 - This document named Josiah as "Joseph Reasor."

B15 - This document and The DAR, Piankeshaw Chapter, Genealogical Records Committee, “Bible Records and Family Records, pages 163-174.” included Thomas Reasor, naming Josiah and Elizabeth Allen Reasor's children as:  Frederick, Thomas, William, Washington, Eliza, and Caroline Reasor.

B16 - This document added that James Reasor died in Louisville in 1859.

B17 - This document omitted any reference to Wm. Reasor.

B18 - This document said "Rutherford" Farm.

B19 - This document said "Elizabeth Cullom."

B20 - This document omitted 1850.

B21 -  This document omitted this sentence:  "Everette Galloway ( 25 ) married Nancy Smith from Indiana moving to Monroe County, Indiana where he now resides."

B22 - This document said "Wm. Galloway married Miss Vidy from Iowa and moved to Oregon."

B23 - This document said "Mahala Galloway married Gideon Adkins from Virginia."

B24 - This document added "Elizabeth Galloway married William McCutcheon from Virginia, moved to Oregon and died there."

B25 - This document omitted the phrase "my mother's sister."

B26 - This document said "Elizabeth Weaver," not Elizabeth Clem.  Elizabeth Weaver and James Scott married in 1843 according to this document.

B27 - This document included additional information about James and Elizabeth Weaver Scott's children.  Born to them 9 children:

            (1)  Mary Scott married Henry Todd.  Children - Willard; Ella; Mamie; Perry; Lou; Grover and Homer Todd.

            (2)  Barbara Scott married George Sarles.  Two children - Perry and Elihu.

            (3)  Ella Scott married David Goss.  2 children - Percy and Ethel Goss.

            (4)  Elizabeth Scott married Louis Miller.  children Claudia and Noble Miller.

            (5)  Clara Scott married Louis Wade; 5 children - Aldora; Ernest; Loalah; Fred and Vernon Wade. (Vernon Wade lived near Martinsburg, Indiana, married Millicent Fordyce)

            (6)  William Scott married a woman in Dubois County.  Children - Ida; Cleveland; Otto; Chester; Lilly; Ernest Scott.

            (7)  Harmon Scott unmarried.

            (8)  James Scott married Clarinda Ferrell.  Children - Madison; William; Nancy; and Ida.

            (9)  Madison Scott married Dianthe Smith.  Children - Morton; Wayne; Cordelia; Mabel and Gertie Mae.

B28 - This document also contained the following about Wesley Scott's wife and children.  "I will now continue with the family of Wesley Scott (the writer of this paper).  He married Rebecca McClintock and they had six children.

            (1)  Belle Scott married Julian Miller.  She did not live but a few years after her marriage and he married another sister to Belle, Eunice.

            (2)  Eunice Scott married Julian Miller - 2 children, Raymond and Madge Miller.

            (3)  James Scott married Addie Norrington.  They had 3 children - Roy; a well-known heart specialist in Cleveland; Guy and Julius

            (4)  Jane Scott married James Scott.  She died several years after her marriage, leaving one son, Cuthbert, who was raised by her sister Hannah.

            (5)  Hannah Scott married Levi H. Scott and to them were born two children - Maude Scott and Berla Scott.

            (6)  Libbie Scott married Alexander Dean and to them were born four children:  Scott Dean, Douglas Dean, Juanita Dean and Lucille Dean.

                        a.  Scott Dean married Ada Railey.  Two children - Anna Marie and Scott E. Dean.

                        b.  Douglas Dean never married - died at 35.

                        c.  Juanita Dean married Fred F. Packwood and they had two children - George and Betty Jane Packwood

                        d.  Lucille Dean married Lee M. Roberts and had 1 daughter, Doris Anna.  Lucille Dean Roberts later married Fred M. Wade who had two children by a first marriage - Helen and Sharon Wade. Fred Wade is the son of Clara Scott Wade."

FOOTNOTES


[1] Wesley G. Scott’s Memoirs “The Scott Family: A Pioneer Family of Kentucky and Indiana,” document in The New Albany - Floyd County Public Library, Indiana Room, New Albany, Indiana.  

[2] See Appendix A. for Robert Scott's Will, Estate Settlement. Coffin payment from estate confirmed his death and burial in Shelby County, Kentucky.  He died following a journey from Indiana to his farm and home in Shelby County, Kentucky.  

[3] Robert Scott's marriage date was estimated from his oldest children's births -- James Scott and John Scott.  

[4]Winifred Green was named in Wesley's memoirs, along with her husband's migrations to Wales.  Her names “Winifred” and “Green” presumed a Scotch-Welsh Celtic name, suggesting origins in Wales or Scotland. 

[5] Winifred Green's death occurred in Montgomery County, Kentucky following the birth of her last known child, Dorris Green Scott, about 1801 and before her husband's 1812 relocation to Shelby County and his subsequent marriage to Abagail. 

[6] See Appendix A. for documentation on Robert Scott’s marriages

[7] Washington County, Indiana Probate Records (1830-1837) Book B, pages 34, 132.  Estate of Abagail Scott, deceased:  James Mitchell, Administrator; Gustavus Clark, Security, 29 April 1831.  Court approved 11 November 1833.

[8] Woodford County, Kentucky Marriages, Latter Day Saints Microfiche, Elias Hedden/Abagail Harmon, 22 March 1798, Woodford County, Kentucky.  Batch 7206807, Sheet 99.

[9] Woodford County, Kentucky Marriage Records noted in the research of Nelson Scott & Ethel Faye York, working independently in research; but, both researchers failed to cite the Marriage Book number/letter and page.

[10] Washington County, Indiana Probate Records (1830-1837) Book B, pages 34, 132.  Estate of Abagail Scott, deceased:  James Mitchell, Administrator; Gustavus Clark, Security, 29 April 1831.  Court approved 11 November 1833.

[11] See Appendix A for Robert Scott’s Will and Probate Record

[12] A. Goff Bedford, Land of our Fathers, History of Clark County, Kentucky, Volume 1,  page 340 and Clark County Deed Book 3, page 206.  The Regular Baptist Church at Goshen is 10 miles northeast of Winchester, Kentucky, located on a ridge above a beautiful valley through which runs Stoner Creek.  The church edifice is no longer a log cabin but a frame building whose site is the oldest place in Clark County where worship services were still held in 1998. 

[13] Records of Washington County, Indiana Commissioners (February 10, 1817 - December 29, 1823), pages 25, 32, 53, 55, 56, 58.  Copied from original records in Salem, Indiana Court house, available at the Washington County Historical Society, John Hay Center, 307 East Market Street, Salem, Indiana.  All pages listed identify Scotts in the Commissioners Records. 

[14]  The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society (Frankfort, Kentucky), Volumes 23 (1925), 24 (1926), and 42 (1944); also, undated typescript “Kentucky, Shelby County Early Marriage Records” , copied from original records at Shelby County by Mrs. J. N. Cunningham and Mrs. Graham Lawrence, Kentucky State Historical Society Library, Frankfort.

[15] American Genealogical Lending Library, (P.O. Box 244, Bountiful, Utah 84010), Montgomery County, Kentucky Taxation,  microfilm V20-0292 Tax List (1797-1812), 1804, Commissioner Book 1.  James first appeared newly married in 1804 Montgomery County, Kentucky Tax List next to his brother John Scott. On January 4, 1804, James Scott and Thomas Ferral posted marriage bond for his sister's marriage to Thomas Ferral.  He also gave affidavit that his sister, Margaret Scott was daughter of  Robert Scott, Clark County Kentucky Marriage Record, Volume I-W, (1793-1831), page 47.  As oldest son, he acted legally in behalf of his absent father and was at least 21 and probably around 25 years of age in 1804. 

[16] Floyd County, Indiana Will Book A, 1819-1837, and Probate Court Records, 1830-1837, page 233.  James Scott Estate, 10-6-1836, Application of John Brock for Administrator of Estate of James Scott, deceased.  Security: Henry Brock.  John Brock was husband of James's eldest daughter, Matilda Scott.

[17] No marriage record has been found for James and Elizabeth Schultz Scott.  The early Montgomery County, Kentucky Courthouse was demolished by several fires in the 19th century.

[18] 1850 Census Owen Township, Jackson County, Indiana, page 201

[19] Mt.  Sterling, Kentucky Public Library family folders for Schultz.  Articles by Harry W. Mills, genealogist and columnist for the Montgomery County newspaper, "The Advocate," Also, Clark County, Kentucky, Taxpayers

[20] Ibid., Wesley G. Scott's Memoirs.  Wesley knew his father's birth year well.

[21] Mt. Eden Church Cemetery tombstone read by Nelson Scott and other Scott genealogists.  The Mt. Eden tombstone incorrectly stated his age at death as 71 yrs.14 days.  His age at death was 81 yrs.14 days which complies with his birth year as stated in the Memoirs by his son Wesley G. Scott. John Scott's grandchildren also put monuments in memory of their grandparents, John and Anna Reasor Scott, at Chapel Hill Cemetery, Chapel Hill Christian Church, Greenville Township, Floyd County, Indiana.  On the Chapel Hill monuments, John Scott's birth year was correctly stated as 1781. 

[22] Kentucky Historical Society, Frankfort, Kentucky, typed sheet listing Shelby County, Kentucky marriages.  Their marriage bond also included Anna Reasor’s birth date. Wesley Scott's Memoirs claim that John and Anna were married by Robert Scott, a Baptist Minister, but nothing was found to indicate who married them.  

[23]  Eunice Ann Cox Herbert, compiler, Michael Reasor and Anna Herbert Descendants, Maylan Industries, Burbank, California, 1968

[24]  Margaret Scott’s birth year was presumed from an analysis of census records, her marriage bond date and, the birth years of brothers and sisters.  Her father, Robert Scott, actually named his daughters in his Will from the eldest to the youngest.  See Appendix A.

[25]  Ibid., Wesley G. Scott's Memoirs reported her year of death

[26]  Clark County Kentucky Marriage Record, Volume I-W, (1793-1831), page 47.  Her brother, James Scott posted marriage bond and served as affiant due to her father's absence as being the daughter of Robert Scott.

[27] Thomas Ferrell does not appear in 1840 Census, Greenville Township Floyd County, IN, only Margaret was named as head of household.

[28]  Clark County, Kentucky Deed Book for 1830, pages 311 & 320.  Clark County, Kentucky Index to Wills and Settlements, 1793-1854.  Peter Ferrell's Will, Book 7, page 138; Inventory, Book 7, page 161; Settlement, Book 7, page 295.

[29]  Both Moses Scott and Elizabeth Shindler’s birth and death dates were found on their tombstone, Mt. Eden Cemetery, Greenville Township, Floyd County, Indiana.  His birth year coincides with the formation date of Woodford County, Virginia which was created from Fayette County, Virginia.  Woodford County became the property of Kentucky upon Statehood in 1792. 

[30]  Kentucky Historical Society, Shelby County, Kentucky Marriages which indicated they were married by Rev. Moses Scott, minister of the Beech Creek Baptist Church, Shelby County, Kentucky; also, Eula Richardson Hasskarl, compiler, Shelby County Kentucky Marriages, Volume 1 (1792-1833) and Volume 2 (1834 – April 1867), Publisher, E. Hasskarl, c1983. Robert Scott, father of Moses, gave security for Moses to obtain a license to marry Elizabeth Shindler.

[31]  The Shelbyville News, (Shelbyville, Kentucky) had the following obituary on George Shindler: Departed this life on the 5th day of December, 1854, Mr. George Shindler (for the last 64 years a citizen of this county,) age 92 years, four months and three days.  The deceased was a soldier in the revolutionary war, when only 16 years of age.  He emigrated from Virginia to this county (Shelby County, Kentucky) in 1790.

[32]  John Amos Dimmit, compiler, Morgan County Kentucky Centennial Book and Folder, West Liberty Public Library, Morgan County, Kentucky.  Mr. Dimmit (deceased) was Carter family genealogist-historian.  Elizabeth Anne Scott's birth place was family folklore but all other information can be verified in Bath County, Montgomery County, and Morgan County, marriage records, cemeteries, deeds, Wills, census records gleaned and shared in family reunions through the years. The Carter family research included 8 generations and it was done independently from Scott family researchers.  The Carters confirmed in their folklore that Elizabeth Anne Scott was daughter of Robert Scott.

[33]  Polly Scott's birth was determined by the order in which her father named his daughters from the eldest to the youngest in his Will.  See Appendix A.  Also, her birth was presumed from her marriage bond date and the birth years of brothers and sisters. 

[34]  Annie Walker Burns, Kentucky Vital Statistics Record of Marriages in Shelby County, Kentucky 1792-1851, Frankfort, Kentucky, 1932, page 55.  Also, Kentucky Historical Library, Frankfort, Kentucky, Shelby County Marriage Bonds.  Marriage bond identified Othniel (Othenile) Mahurin as father to Samuel Mahurin and Polly as daughter of Robert Scott; mother, Abagail Scott (actually Polly's step-mother). Wesley G. Scott's memoirs said "Mary Scott married Frederick Razor from Woodford County, Kentucky in 1819, settled in Spencer County, Kentucky and lived there until his death in 1842."   We must revise Wesley’s memoirs for Polly (Mary) Scott's marriage was with Samuel Mahurin of Shelby County, Kentucky.  See Appendix A where in Robert Scott's Will he named his daughter, Polly Mahurin, and the Settlement papers showed his daughter’s legacy was issued to Samuel Mahurin. 

[35]  Ron Mahurin and F. H. Huron, compilers, Mahurin Family:  The Later Generations, Terre Haute, IN, (Family Mahurin History and Book)  page 7. 

[36]  Wesley G. Scott and Ron Mahurin agreed that Polly (Mary) Scott's husband died probably around 1842.  It is interesting that they both reached this conclusion with reference to different husbands for Polly (Mary) Scott.  The date of her husband's death was probably correct.  No other information is available at this juncture of research.

[37]  Dorris Green Scott's birth year was presumed from family folklore as the youngest child of Robert and Winifred (Green) Scott and birth year was estimated from his marriage date and census records. 

[38]  Nancy Lucas Scott was head of household in 1850 Jackson County, Indiana Census, page 112, presumably Dorris Green Scott's death occurred before 1850.

[39]  Marriages, 1815-1833, Indiana Source Book by Heiss, page 226-240

[40]  Nancy Lucas Scott's birth year was from census records.

[41]  Jeffersonville Land Office : Tract Books and Register of Receipts (Cash) From 1820 TO 1854.  Indiana State Library(Archives), Indianapolis, Indiana.  Microfilm, Tract Books 2, 3, & 4.

[42]  Shelby County, Kentucky Executors Settlement Book. 7, page 140, June Court 1826, Shelby County, Kentucky.

[43] Virginia County Records, Volume 2, Virginia Colonial Militia, 1651-1776, edited by William Armstrong Crozier, Genealogical Publishing Company, 1993, page 79;  also, Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck, Virginia's Colonial Soldier, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1988, page 150 

[44] Wendell H. Rone, Sr., An Historical Atlas of Kentucky and Her Counties, Mayfield Printing Company, Mayfield, Kentucky, page 14

[45]  Ibid.,  Virginia's Colonial Soldier, page 151

[46]  American Genealogical Lending Library, (P.O. Box 244, Bountiful, Utah 84010), Fayette County, Kentucky Taxation, microfilm V20-0100 Tax List (1787-1804):  Before 1792 all taxes were paid to Fayette County District of Kentucky, State of Virginia.  After 1792, all taxes were paid to Kentucky upon its statehood. 

[47] 1789 Fayette County, Kentucky Tax List - The following persons were in the domain of Woodford County, Kentucky but taxed by Fayette because Woodford was established after taxation dates:  Moses Scott, Archelis Scott, Robert Scott listed together but separately from other Scotts named.  Moses & Archelis’ taxes were recorded on June 4, 1789;  Robert Scott’s taxes were recorded on  June 5, 1789.  William Harmon and Thomas Harmon were in same tax district as Robert, Moses, Archelis Scott. (Wm. Harmon, father of Robert Scott’s 2nd wife.)

[48] History of Woodford County Kentucky,  pages 155, 289-290

[49] Indiana State Library, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1790 Woodford County Kentucky Tax List, microfilm, Book One, County Commissioner, Bartlett Collins, taxation for district north of South Elkhorn river. Book One was a complete alphabetical listing.  But, a second book, name of commissioner illegible, was partially lost because it was an incomplete alphabetical listing, giving surnames only through the letter “M”.  So, Scott residents were not available in the second 1790 tax book. 

[50] Indiana State Library, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1791 Woodford County Kentucky Tax List, microfilm, presumably a complete set of 3 taxation books by commissioners.  Also, American Genealogical Lending Library, (P.O. Box 244, Bountiful, Utah 84010),  Woodford County, Kentucky Taxation, microfilm V20-0393 Tax List (1790-1814).  Before 1792 all taxes were paid to Woodford County, District of Kentucky, State of Virginia.  After 1792, all taxes were paid to Kentucky upon its statehood. 

[51]  ibid., Woodford County, Kentucky Taxation, microfilm V20-0393 Tax List (1790-1814)

[52] Clark County Court Index to Deeds, Volume T-V:  The deed book itself  was no longer available, lost or destroyed; but, the Index Book to Deeds was available .  American Genealogical Lending Library, (P.O. Box 244, Bountiful, Utah 84010), Clark County, Kentucky Taxation, microfilm V20-0076 Tax List (1793-1809) but no tax list available for 1798:  John Scott taxations from 1793 thru 1796; Robert Scott and Edward Scott taxations from 1795 thru 1799; Archelaus Scott taxation from 1797 thru 1799; Moses Scott, presumed son of Archelaus Scott,  had taxation after his marriage from 1799 thru 1802.  No deed has been found for Moses Scott’s ownership but he was taxed on land owned by his father, Archelaus.  Peter Ferrel first taxed in 1796.  Peter was the father of  Thomas Ferrel who married Margaret Scott, eldest daughter of Robert Scott.  Christian Shults first taxed in 1796, father of Elizabeth Shults who married Robert Scott’s eldest son, James Scott.  A. Goff Bedford, Land of our Fathers, History of Clark County, Volume 1,  page 340 : Robert Scott, trustee for Regular Baptist Church at Goshen, Clark County, Kentucky.  (Clark County, Kentucky Deed Book 3, page 206).  Log cabin church on Stoner Creek. Goshen is 10 miles northeast of Winchester, Kentucky, the county seat of Clark County, Kentucky.  

[53] Clark County Kentucky Early Marriages, Winchester, Kentucky Public Library.  Moses Scott married Rachel Hardy in 1798. Rachel Hardy's father, Andrew Hardy, gave consent for her marriage to Moses Scott

[54] ibid., Montgomery County, Kentucky Taxation,  microfilm V20-0292 Tax List (1797-1812):  Taxation years are noted between parenthesis:  Robert and Edward Scott (1800-1810); Robert Scott’s sons, James and John Scott, (1804-1809); son, John Scott (1810-1812) but not James Scott; Edward Scott was in 1810 Montgomery County, Kentucky Census and 1811 Tax List; Thomas Ferrel first appeared on tax list in 1806.  Thomas Ferrell was husband of Margaret Scott, daughter of Robert Scott. Joseph Carter, Sr., father of Joseph Carter, Jr., who married Elizabeth Scott, Robert Scott’s daughter, first appeared on tax list in 1805.

[55] Clark County Kentucky Marriage Record, Volume I-W, (1793-1831), page 47: marriage bond, consent form, and affidavit

[56] American Genealogical Lending Library, (P.O. Box 244, Bountiful, Utah 84010), Clark County, Kentucky Taxation,  microfilm V20-0076 Tax List (1793-1809):  Robert Scott, Edward Scott, John Scott taxation from 1795 to 1796;  In 1796, taxation for Peter Ferrel, father of  Thomas Ferrel, who married Robert Scott’s daughter, Margaret.  In 1796, taxation for Christian Shults, father of Elizabeth Schultz who married Robert Scott’s son, James Scott.  Then taxation for Robert Scott, Arch Scott, Edward Scott from 1797 thru 1799.  No tax list available for 1798.  Ibid, Montgomery County, Kentucky Taxation,  microfilm V20-0292 Tax List (1797-1812):  Taxation for Robert and Edward Scott from 1800 thru 1803; Taxation for Robert Scott’s sons, James and John Scott, and Edward Scott from 1804-1810; Taxation in 1806 for Thomas Ferrel, husband of Margaret Scott, daughter of Robert, and also taxation begins in 1805 for Joseph Carter, Sr., father of Joseph Carter, Jr., who married Elizabeth Scott, Robert Scott’s daughter. 

[57] Mt. Sterling, Kentucky Public Library, tax assessment records, compiled on typed sheets, no author given.  County Commissioners kept books on property and poll taxes in their specific districts and submitted payments which were recorded by the county clerk. Nelson S. Scott researched not only the microfilm tax lists but Montgomery County Tax Assessment Records (1801-1805).  

[58] Shelby County, Kentucky Deed Book F-1, page 421:  14 January 1805, Archelaus Scott purchased from Isaiah & Sarah Williams, 135 acres, Beech Creek.  Taxation record said 160 acres but deed said 135 acres!  

[59] Eula Richardson Hasskarl, compiler, Shelby County Kentucky Marriages, Volume 1 (1792-1833) and Volume 2 (1834 – April 1867), Publisher, E. Hasskarl, c1983:  Robert Scott & Catherine Reddish married 19 September 1813.  She was sister to John Reddish. Also, Shelby County, Kentucky Deed Book N-1, page 183, indicated Robert & Catherine Scott purchased 237 acres, Beech Creek, from Hannah Boyd, 15 July 1816  

[60]  American Genealogical Lending Library, (P.O. Box 244, Bountiful, Utah 84010), Shelby County, Kentucky Taxation,  microfilm Tax List (1811- 1826)

[61] Samuel Mahuren household, 1820 U.S. census, Shelby County, Kentucky, No Township Listed, stamped page 128 or unstamped page 123, line 25; National Archives micropublication M33, roll 24

[62] Shelby County, Kentucky Executors Settlement Book 7, page 140, June Court 1826, Shelby County, Kentucky.

[63]  Shelby County, Kentucky Settlement Book 6, page 248,  October Court 1824, Shelby County, Kentucky  

[64]  Shelby County, Kentucky Deed Book Z-1, page 242:  The deed indicated “Lewis and Polly Harmon of Monroe County, Indiana” and the land was sold as 100 acres, Beech Creek, located at Mahuron’s Corner.  Michael Ritter was from Shelby County, Kentucky. 

[65] Mrs. E. B. Smith, Mrs. J.R. Cunningham, Mrs. Graham Lawrence of Shelbyville, Kentucky -- compilers, Kentucky Marriage Records from the Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, Genealogical Publishing County, Baltimore, 1983, page 758: Also, her marriage bond was found by Ethel Fay York on a typed list at the Kentucky Historical Society for Shelby County, Kentucky.  The bond at the Kentucky Historical Society indicated that Othniel Mahurin was the father of Samuel Mahurin, and Robert and Abagail Scott were parents of Polly.  (Of course, Abagail was her step-mother.); Annie Walker Burns, Kentucky Vital Statistics Record of Marriages in Shelby County, Kentucky 1792-1851, Frankfort, Kentucky, 1932, page 55.

[66] See Appendix B

[67] See Appendix A

[68] Shelby County, Kentucky Executors Settlement Book 7, page 140, June Court 1826, Shelby County, Kentucky.

[69] Washington County, Indiana Deed Record Book C, (January 1823--April 1826), pages 460-461:  December 24, 1822, Archelaus Scott of  Jackson Township, Washington County, Indiana sold 80 acres to Frederick Watty, West ½ of Southwest ¼ , Section 24, Township 1 South, Range 4 East, land adjoining John Duvaco, south side, and adjoining Frederick Watty’s, (Waddy) land.  The deed said that Frederick Watty was from Fayette County, Kentucky. 

[70] American Genealogical Lending Library, Spencer County, Kentucky Tax List (1824-1829), microfilm.  Harmon Scott’s tax list showed evaluation of $140 and 4 horses in 1825; and $50.00, 1 horse in 1826.

[71] Shelby County, Kentucky Deed Book T-1, page 385

[72] Platbook Entries from New Albany-Floyd County Public Library on Floyd County Deeds

[73] Willard Heiss, editor, Indiana Source Book Volume II, Indiana Historical Society, Washington County, Indiana Marriages 1815-1833, page 237

[74] Washington County, Indiana Deed Records Book B. November 1817- January 1823, page 157: Robert Scott, Washington County, Indiana, purchased for $800, December 3, 1818, from Salomon & Nancy Bush, Southeast ¼, Section 1, Township 1 South, Range 4 East;  ibid., Deed Book D, April 1825-Oct 1828:  Robert & Susannah Scott, Washington County, Indiana, sold February 23, 1826, 110 acres, east side of Southeast ¼, Section 1, Township 1 South, Range 4 East, to Jacob Miller; also sold February 23, 1826, no acres recorded, west side, Southeast ¼, Section 1, Township 1 South, Range 4 East, sold to Jonathan Urmy.  Robert and Susannah Scott sold same land purchased 12/3/1818 from Salomon and Nancy Bush to Jonathan Urmy, brother of Susannah Scott.

[75] Jacob Urmy's Will was dated 9/5/1831, probated in Washington County, Indiana, 10/11/1831.  Jacob Urmy's wife was named Susanna, too!

[76] Dorothy Riker, Compiler, Clark County, Indiana Abstracts of Wills and Executors’ Records (1801-1833) and Marriage Records (1807-1824), Genealogy Section, Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, Indiana, 1969, page 23:  Abner Martin was appointed administrator, February 29, 1828 for Robert Scott's estate; Security made by John M. Lemon. 

[77] Grace Sutherlin Marks, (Mrs. W. Oliver Marks), 1882-1953, of Salem, IN,  Marks Manuscripts, Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, (Box 2, Folder Jackson Township, Washington County, Indiana.)  Scott Graveyard researched by Grace S. Marks & Lulie Davis, 29 November 1941

[78] Washington County, Indiana Probate Record Book B (1830-1837), pages 54-55, 94:  Jacob Urmy's Will dated 5 September 1831, probated 11 October 1831:  Named wife, Susanna Urmy; sons - Christian, Abraham, Jonathan, Jacob, John Urmy; daughters - Esther Callahan, Katherine Miller, Susanna Scott.  Executors - son, Jonathan Urmy and friend, Isaac Heistand; witnesses, Jacob Bixler, Isaac Heistand, John W. Smith

[79] Washington County, Indiana Probate Record Book B (1830-1837), pages 18, 20: 21 December 1830, Henry Young, Administrator of Robert & Susannah Scott’s estate, Jonathan Urmy made security.  6 January 1831, their children named, guardianship authorized. 

[80] See Appendix B in this document

[81] History of Washington County, Indiana, page 568

[82] Records of Washington County, Indiana Commissioners (February 10, 1817 - December 29, 1823), pages 25, 32, 53, 55, 56, 58.  Copied from original records in Salem, Indiana Court house, available at the Washington County Historical Society, John Hay Center, 307 East Market Street, Salem, Indiana.

[83] Washington County, Indiana Marriages, 1815-1833, Indiana Source Book by Heiss, page 226-240

[84]  George Pence and Nellie C. Armstrong, Indiana Boundaries -- Territory, State, and County, (Indiana Historical Bureau,  Indianapolis, 1933), pages 420 - 427.  This book is included in Indiana Historical Collections, Volume XIX, Indiana State Library

[85]Washington County, Indiana Probate Records (1830-1837) Book B, pages 34, 132.  Estate of Abagail Scott, deceased:  James Mitchell, Administrator; Gustavus Clark, Security, 29 April 1831.  Court approved 11 November 1833.

[86] Henry K. Shaw, author,  Hoosier Disciples, 1966, page 35

[87] George Pence and Nellie C. Armstrong, Indiana Boundaries -- Territory, State, and County, (Indiana Historical Bureau,  Indianapolis, 1933), pages 420 - 427.  This book was included in Indiana Historical Collections, Volume XIX, Indiana State Library

[88] Washington County, Indiana  Marriages, 1815-1833, Indiana Source Book by Heiss, page 226-240

[89] “Land Management Folder” New Albany-Floyd County Library, a commissioned research document sponsored by the New Albany Museum to establish the first Floyd County land owners in all County Sections.  Robert Scott was named as the first original land owner in Section 19, Township 1 South, Range 5 East with 183.25 acres.

[90] Washington County Historical Society, John Hay Center, 307 E. Market Street, Salem, Indiana.  Plat Book sheet of early Washington County, Indiana property owners, page 122,  named precisely Archelaus Scott’s Section 36 property

[91] Washington County, Indiana Deed Record Book C, (January 1823--April 1826), pages 460-461

[92] Platbook Entries from New Albany-Floyd County Library on Floyd County Deeds

[93] Floyd County Deed Book G. page 328.  Thomas Wilson who purchased the land also put up security for John Galloway to act as the Administrator of Archelaus Scott's estate.  Federal Land records show that Archelaus Scott purchased 40 acres, NW-SE, Section 25, Township 1 South, Range 5 East from the Jeffersonville Land Office, certificate #3975, Accession # IN0270_.464, on October 1, 1834.  The patent land certificate said, “Archelaus Scott of Floyd County, Indiana.” Clarissa Shepherd Scott evidently sold the land to Thomas Wilson following Archelaus’ death and transferred the certificate to Thomas Wilson after October 1, 1834.  Archelaus’ death was supported by these land documents as occurring around May - June, 1834.

[94] “Land Management Folder” New Albany-Floyd County Library, a commissioned research document sponsored by the New Albany Museum to establish the first Floyd County land owners in all County Sections.  Robert Scott was named as the first original land owner in Section 19, Township 1 South, Range 5 East with 183.25 acres.

[95] Grace Sutherlin Marks, (Mrs. W. Oliver Marks), 1882-1953, of Salem, IN,  Marks Manuscripts, Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, Box 1, Folder - Greenville Community Section 19

[96] Ibid., Marks Manuscripts, Box 1, Folder - Big Blue River Township, Harrison County, Indiana, “One Day In The Life of a History Worker.”

[97] Shelby County, Kentucky Court Order Book, letter “I” or Numeral “1”.  Nelson Scott photocopied this entry.

 

Website (www.scottfamily.beamsco.com) & DVD/CD produced by for Compiler and Narrator Nelson Scott Danville Illinois 2006 email scottdnvll @ insightbb .com